W7 64 bit cant Network Share

My stamina is waning, I’m near the end of expending any more energy, thought I’d give it one more try.

I have owned the WD TV Live for a couple of months now and I have never once seen any Network Share folder. If I had a nickle for every tutorial and workaround I’ve tried that resulted in bringing me yet again to the Network Shares icon and a hopeful press of the button only to haver hope dashed yet again I’d be a wealthy wealthy man.

I have checked ports and IP addresses, I have followed the Master Browser tutorial I found here, or maybe somewhere else, I forget, I have left the Homegroup, I have used passwords, not used passwords, created a workgroup, checked my router configuration, disabled virus protection, opened ports and closed ports, I have done everything and chased every thread I’ve found to solve this and have found no solution but rather have been verbally assaulted as if I have brought this upon myself. Unbelivable.

I e-mailed support, heres the latest failure:

We are sorry for the inconveniences. In this case, since the device has been designed to be used with network connectivity and also your Windows 7 (if appropriately setup) should allow this connection, we need to evaluate the possible reasons for a possible intaraction problem.

  • Confirm that your WD TV device has the latest firmware version and please reset to factory default (by pressing and holding the reset button for no more than 4 seconds).

Answer Title: How to update the firmware on a WD TV Live HD Media Player or WD TV Live Plus HD Media Player
Answer Link: http://wdc.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/5343

  • Please ensure that both units are in the same workgroup and the Windows 7 settings are correct following this instructions:

Answer Title: How to share a folder in Windows that can be viewed with the WD TV Live, Live Streaming, Live Hub, or Live Plus
Answer Link: http://wdc.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/3787

Answer Title: Unable to access the Media Server through the WD TV Live Hub, Live Plus, Live Streaming, or Live on a Windows 7 computer
Answer Link: http://wdc.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/3792

  • Ensure that the network settings are correctly setup in your WD TV Live Plus device:
  1. Click in “Start” (lower-right microsoft symbol) and then, in the search box, type this: cmd , press ENTER. A black Command Prompt will come up, there, please type this: ipconfiog /all (including the space in this specific order) and press ENTER. A large amount of data will come up showing you your IP Address, Subnet Mask, Gateway and DNS.

  2. You can transfer all the data can be transferred to your WD TV Live network settings page exactly the same, except for the IP Address to witch the value of 10 can should be added in the last 2 digits (Ex.: 100.168.2.106 adding the value of 10 it would be 100.168.2.116).

After this, for you to access the files that had been shared, you need to access the Network Shares in your WD TV Live menu, in it, you should see the computer and inside of it, the shared content.

If this is not the case or If you have require of any further guidace, please reply to this email and we will be happy to assist you further.

At this point let me ask…is there something else on the market that plays all the file types this plays yet is able to connect to my W7 files without an act of God?

Act of God?   Probably not… 

The WDTVs make use of the GPL SAMBA library, as do probably 99% of the streamers on the market.

While there’s no guarantee either way, I would imagine that if WD can’t connect to your box, the other devices using the same GPL software won’t either.  :(

The Master Browser tutorial you refer to may have been mine:

http://community.wdc.com/t5/Networking/Troubleshooting-Windows-File-Sharing/m-p/92642#U92642

So, go through it again, and post all the output you collect as you go through that process.

To Cut & paste the text from a CMD window:   After you’ve opened the window, right click that window’s title bar and select PROPERTIES from the menu.  In the OPTIONS tab, ensure “QuickEdit Mode” is CHECKED, then click OK.

After executing a command, position your mouse cursor in the upper left of the text you want to copy, then hold down the left mouse button and drag to the lower right to select, then RIGHT CLICK to COPY into your clipboard.

Thanks for the reply. Yes the tutorial I followed was yours, and thanks for taking the time and effort to post that. I followed it and found no problems (other than the fact that my machine is connected both wirelessly and wired to my router, which cost me hours and hours of troubleshooting also to no avail)

but that was many tweaks ago and I have no idea how its configuerd now.

Heres the results:

C:\Users\D’s>net view

Server Name            Remark


\ACER-D3C08B49AF

\DS-HP

\WDTVLIVEPLUS         WDTV LIVE

The command completed successfully.

C:\Users\D’s>nbtstat -a acer-d3c08b49af

Wireless Network Connection:

Node IpAddress: [192.168.1.6] Scope Id: []

 NetBIOS Remote Machine Name Table

 Name               Type         Status

 ---------------------------------------------

 ACER-D3C08B49AF<00>  UNIQUE  Registered

 WORKGROUP      <00>  GROUP       Registered

 ACER-D3C08B49AF<20>  UNIQUE  Registered

 MAC Address = 00-13-02-33-08-8F

C:\Users\D’s>nbtstat -a ds-hp

Local Area Connection:

Node IpAddress: [192.168.1.3] Scope Id: []

 NetBIOS Remote Machine Name Table

       Name               Type         Status

    ---------------------------------------------

    DS-HP          <00>  UNIQUE      Registered

    WORKGROUP      <00>  GROUP       Registered

    WORKGROUP      <1E>  GROUP       Registered

    DS-HP          <20>  UNIQUE      Registered

    MAC Address = 78-E7-D1-C8-69-69

Wireless Network Connection:

Node IpAddress: [192.168.1.6] Scope Id: []

NetBIOS Remote Machine Name Table

       Name               Type         Status

    ---------------------------------------------

    DS-HP          <00>  UNIQUE      Registered

    WORKGROUP      <00>  GROUP       Registered

    WORKGROUP      <1E>  GROUP       Registered

    DS-HP          <20>  UNIQUE      Registered

    WORKGROUP      <1D>  UNIQUE      Registered

    …__MSBROWSE__.<01>  GROUP       Registered

    MAC Address = 68-A3-C4-EA-B8-BB

C:\Users\D’s>nbtstat -a wdtvliveplus

Local Area Connection:

Node IpAddress: [192.168.1.3] Scope Id: []

           NetBIOS Remote Machine Name Table

       Name               Type         Status

    ---------------------------------------------

    WDTVLIVEPLUS   <00>  UNIQUE      Registered

    WDTVLIVEPLUS   <03>  UNIQUE      Registered

    WDTVLIVEPLUS   <20>  UNIQUE      Registered

    WORKGROUP      <1E>  GROUP       Registered

    WORKGROUP      <00>  GROUP       Registered

    MAC Address = 00-00-00-00-00-00

Wireless Network Connection:

Node IpAddress: [192.168.1.6] Scope Id: []

           NetBIOS Remote Machine Name Table

       Name               Type         Status

    ---------------------------------------------

    WDTVLIVEPLUS   <00>  UNIQUE      Registered

    WDTVLIVEPLUS   <03>  UNIQUE      Registered

    WDTVLIVEPLUS   <20>  UNIQUE      Registered

    WORKGROUP      <1E>  GROUP       Registered

    WORKGROUP      <00>  GROUP       Registered

    MAC Address = 00-00-00-00-00-00

C:\Users\D’s>net view /domain

Domain


WORKGROUP

The command completed successfully.

C:\Users\D’s>

C:\Users\D’s>nbtstat -a 192.168.1.3

Local Area Connection:

Node IpAddress: [192.168.1.3] Scope Id: []

           NetBIOS Remote Machine Name Table

       Name               Type         Status

    ---------------------------------------------

    DS-HP          <00>  UNIQUE      Registered

    WORKGROUP      <00>  GROUP       Registered

    WORKGROUP      <1E>  GROUP       Registered

    DS-HP          <20>  UNIQUE      Registered

    MAC Address = 78-E7-D1-C8-69-69

Wireless Network Connection:

Node IpAddress: [192.168.1.6] Scope Id: []

           NetBIOS Remote Machine Name Table

       Name               Type         Status

    ---------------------------------------------

    DS-HP          <00>  UNIQUE      Registered

    WORKGROUP      <00>  GROUP       Registered

    WORKGROUP      <1E>  GROUP       Registered

    DS-HP          <20>  UNIQUE      Registered

    MAC Address = 78-E7-D1-C8-69-69

My head hurts, gotta get more coffee

You’ve got one of those wierd configurations where your PC is configured to run on BOTH a WIRED and WIRELESS network.

That’s the case right now; your PC has two IP addresses and two active interfaces.

I would bet that is the root of the issue.

I would suggest you just DISABLE your wireless interface since they both appear to be on the same network anyway…

Well, thank you for that, I’ve gotten further than ever. When I press on Network Share it actually shows my computer and drives within my computer. No content is displayed, but i figure with another month of trying, who knows I may be able to play video.

I had to completely shut down the wireless card, there is no workaround for simultaneous wired and wireless connection. Thus far I must say I’m not too impressed with W7.

I had the same problem with another device, I got wxhausted, just like you and I found the solution in some dark corner of Internet. I’ll make it short and simple and I hope it works for you (God knows it was a hard puzzle for me). I found the solution in Spanish (I am from Spain), so I’ll try to translate the software options as literally as possible (it shouldn’t be a problem for you, since these options are pretty straight forward and I am a translator xD).

Modifications on Windows7

  1. Check “Turn off password protected sharing” on Advanced sharing settings.

  2. Share the folders you want to share and add All in the “rights” section.

  3. Open Run dialog box (Windows key + R) and type regedit.

3a. Go to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Contro l\Lsa. On the right hand, double click on “everyoneincludesanonymous” and change the value from 0 to 1.

Then double click on NoLmHash and change it’s value from 1 to 0.

3b. Go to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Servic es\LanManServer\Parameters and change “restrictnullsessaccess” value from 1 to 0.

  1. Close regedit window and restart the PC.

They say (on the forum I found it) that this procedure reduces security on the PC, but it’s the only apparent way to go around this issue. Hope it works for you.

No difference.

W7 is the absolute worst ever. I dont think I’ll ever buy another Micorcrap product again.

Thanks for taking the time to reply

I don’t think seven is a bad product but I also have the same issue.

I followed all guides without success.

Wow, this sounds like a horror story of great proportions.  Sorry you’ve had to experience it.

From a guy with a Win 7 HP laptop and who got his WDTV unit last year, I had to learn from scratch about networking, sharing and all those things involved.  It took me a year to figure out my big problem, and it turned out to be related to Win 7 sharing; it appears that with lots of media files to share, Win 7 took it’s time to do so – like 20 minutes to completely write a file so my 9000 music files got shared with WDTV under “media server” conditions.

It was a simple solution once I found it.  In the process, here’s some things I’ve learned about network sharing:

We don’t need a media player to share files, say between two computers.  So, with a media player out of the picture it’s all up to my Win 7 and the XP computer to get it all right.  And, it is – now.  Sharing figured out, now add in the media player.

The less tweaking and file configuration changing the better.  With what I know now, I could get two computers to share files between them pretty quickly today – it’s that “easy” if the computers have not been whacked out with inappropriate tweaking.

It is so simple to share, that when my daughter came by with her Mac laptop, she could find my WDTV and the disk attached to it on the network, locate a movie ISO file, and play it.  No tweaking required.  Same with my friend with a Vista laptop.  So, don’t get discouraged.

At this point, you have tweaked so many things, no telling what’s “right” and what’s “wrong” with your Win 7 machine now (and router if you tweaked it also.)

My suggestion:

Locate  those back up disks that came with the PC or that you created when it was brand new, and revert things back to “new” again.  It’s a lot of work, sure, but it can be done and sometimes necessary.  If you tweaked router settings, press the reset button to get back to the default settings and set it up again.

When you have things right again, get the PC to share through the  with another PC that is in good working condition. Once they share you are almost ready to go with the media player added.

I do wish you success with your situation.

Windows 7 64 bit has a number of networking issues; most are related to motherboard design.

The following forums may be helpful:

http://forums.mydigitallife.info/index.php

http://www.neowin.net/forum/

http://www.sevenforums.com/

http://www.sevenforums.com/tutorials/257-windows-7-tutorial-index.html

http://www.windowsnetworking.com/

Additional info:

The other day I responded to the originator of this thread (see message above) and I said I had come to realize that setting up a home network is “easy” (after I had learned how the hard way, i.e… I learned how from the Win 7 Help instructions; jeez what gibberish.) .  I said this not to make anyone feel like a dunce, but to help folks from being discouraged by the task.

Since then, I went looking online for some easy instructions.  Once a media player is out of the picture, it’s a matter of setting up two (or more) PCs to share files.  Here are the instructions I found.  Although for XP machines, it applies to Vista and Win 7 PCs; albeit with their particular jargon.

Setting Up an XP Home Media Server

http://delflo.com/tag/media-server/ 

It’s the kind of instructions to share with friends who want to set up a home network.  Once the basic sharing network is set up, bringing a media player like WDTV into the mix becomes more manageable.

Mmh, all I had to do to make it run, was to set my LIVE-S to the same workgroup and I could immediately access shares from Win 7 64 and 32, XP and MyBook.

Right, setting up a WDTV is quite easy once the basic sharing network between the PCs is set up via Windows, and even that part doesn’t have to be difficult if the PCs are in good working order.

Recently, I built a media computer using a HP N36L Server. I installed Vista 32 bit, upgraded to SP2 and installed the updates. Vista set up the network automatically, recognised the WDTV Live and I experienced no video streaming issues.

The only reason I used Vista is because I own an unused Vista licence.

There are known networking issues with Windows 7 64 bit. Those issues are confined to certain motherboard, drivers and networking configurations when using Windows 7 64 bit. Windows 7 32 bit behaves differently. It is best to search the various Windows forums for a resolution rather than using a guide someone has published on a blog.   

Sorry, I don’t agree with the panoguy’s assessment of the guide link I posted.  Admittedly , it likely won’t help our friend who has the problem here, because I fear his computer is now whacked out beyond recognition.  It appears he broke a cardinal rule about electronic gizmos:  If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it. 

But, if a novice is setting up a home network to share for the first time (using accurately working computers) this guide does a better job of explaining sharing and how to set it up than does Microsoft’s clear-as-mud discussions in the Windows help screens.

@mike27oct,

Microsoft’s guides are written for professional system administrators by Microsoft system engineers who don’t want laymen to learn anything about computers. The Microsoft Help inside the OS is just as confusing.

Microsoft also charges for support, therefore it is in their interest to post guides using jargon that is a clear as mud.

The guide you posted a link to is for a Windows XP computer. The guide may work for people using a Windows XP computer. This thread complaint relates to issues about Windows 7 64 bit. Using virgin computer components and a virgin Windows 7 64 bit install there are known hardware issues. The reason is that not all computer hardware components are manufactured equal. That is why there are so many complaints about Windows 7 networking.

If you believe that the guide you posted works, I suggest that you start a new thread titled Windows XP networking guide because someone will ask the Windows XP networking question without reading this post. 

It appears we agree more than disagree – especially when it comes to clear-as-mud Microsoft instructions in Windows help screens.  In all fairness to my Microsoft friends 20 miles away in Redmond, I have also read lots of clearly written instructions from Microsoft.

>>>   If you believe that the guide you posted works, I suggest that you start a new thread titled Windows XP networking guide because someone will ask the Windows XP networking question without reading this post. 

I have no interest in posting instuctions for setting up a home sharing network for XP, Vista, Win 7 etc.  The purpose of providing the link was to demonstrate there ARE clearly written instructions available for setting this stuff all up, other than the built-in Windows instructions.

In my particular case, I have Win 7 and XP machines in the house, and getting them all to connect was a chore for me when I first did so.  Now, I know what to search for on the Internet, e.g.  these kind of instructions:

Share Files and Printers between Windows 7 and XP - How-To Geek 

This link is provided as an example of clear instructions only, so please don’t anyone nit-pick at them for accuracy and “what’s wrong”.  They are only another example of clearer instructions beyond what Windows often provides in the Help screens.