Before you pack up your WD and return it, let's talk about Copying Speeds!


#101

I have my Cloud attached to my router and an external HDD attached directly to the Cloud and… speed reads 604Kb/sec.

Don’t plug the USB HDD into the MyCloud.

Even WD recommend that, for bulk data transfers, you plug the USB HDD into the PC, and transfer files via the PC (it’s in the manual, in Appendix B, p113).

The USB port on the MyCloud might have USB3 compliant hardware, but the processor cannot transfer data at anywhere near USB3 speeds.


Slow Usb 3.0 Transfer Speeds (one twentieth expected speed)
#102

cpt_paranoia wrote:

I have my Cloud attached to my router and an external HDD attached directly to the Cloud and… speed reads 604Kb/sec.

 

Don’t plug the USB HDD into the MyCloud.

 

Even WD recommend that, for bulk data transfers, you plug the USB HDD into the PC, and transfer files via the PC (it’s in the manual, in Appendix B, p113).

 

The USB port on the MyCloud might have USB3 compliant hardware, but the processor cannot transfer data at anywhere near USB3 speeds.

although very true of what you said cpt_paranoia, there are some circumstances where usage of the USB 3 port at the back of the cloud is preferable like my Mac mini which has lowly usb 2 ports only.

Thus using the cloud USB 3, which my “My Book” is connected to, I can get reads of up to 75MB/s then send it back to “My Cloud” at write speeds of 40MB/s.

If I SSH to the “My Cloud” and initiate a copy command from “My Book” to “My Cloud” I actually get 40MB/s copies. Note this is only true if it is a “My Book” connected. When a unknown brand (actually Vantec Raid Stripe 0 with USB 3 speeds of 140MB/s when connected to a PC with USB 3) is connected to “My Cloud” it slows the whole connection down to a measley 20MB/s copy or there-abouts. 

You won’t get USB 3 speeds but you will get a decent network speed which is only 5MB/s slower then accessing the “My Cloud” itself.

It was the first test that I performed last year to ensure that the “My Cloud” was growable in a manner of speaking through the USB 3 port.

If you do have a USB 3 port on your PC, then by all means plug it in.


#103

I did some similar tests using cp via SSH, and got some pitiful results; they’re on a thread somewhere… It seems to be something of a lottery…


#104

cpt_paranoia wrote:

I did some similar tests using cp via SSH, and got some pitiful results; they’re on a thread somewhere… It seems to be something of a lottery…

Buy the right ticket then :-p

it has to be the wd my book USB 3 otherwise lottery

the thing is that I’m sure it gets a USB 3 read and write speed but I think it limited by the CPU within the cloud thus the max of 35MB/s writes and I think 75MB/s reads. 


#105

I bought one of these last week and have suffered enough with it already - many lost hours.

I tried the SSH tips on this thread and that did allow me to at least put some data on the drive (USB3.0 drive uploading via Gb network). I only put 300Gb of movies on it and it just chokes ALL THE TIME. I restrated the services and let it index - it finally stopped after a day. And now it just sits there being unresponsive, not showing up on any of my DLNA players and being uber slow at everything, even the management UI or Twonky UI.

I’ve had enough and bought a Sonology so thw WD My Cloud is going back - or imay video myslef beating it with a hammer and upload it to YouTube.

Really disappointed TBD. It needs so much more refinement.


#106

I’m soooooooo disappointed in Western Digital for this device.  I can upload a 4.0 GB folder full of photos to Dropbox in 49 seconds and it take 9 minutes and 52 seconds, or 12 times as long to upload the exact same folder to my wire connected  WD My Cloud.  Yes it is connected at 1000 mbs or Gigabit.  I’m on my second replacement (read 3d device) and so it’s brand new (may be recertified), but clean and empty.  It took approximately 20 and 1/2 hours to upload 406 Gb of photos.  including RAW and jpg, with a few PSDs thrown in.  I love WD hard drives but I hate this thing.


#107

BullRhino wrote:

I’m soooooooo disappointed in Western Digital for this device.  I can upload a 4.0 GB folder full of photos to Dropbox in 49 seconds and it take 9 minutes and 52 seconds, or 12 times as long to upload the exact same folder to my wire connected  WD My Cloud.  Yes it is connected at 1000 mbs or Gigabit.  I’m on my second replacement (read 3d device) and so it’s brand new (may be recertified), but clean and empty.  It took approximately 20 and 1/2 hours to upload 406 Gb of photos.  including RAW and jpg, with a few PSDs thrown in.  I love WD hard drives but I hate this thing.

Try all the trouble shooting steps including a direct pc to cloud ethernet connection to determine why you are getting the slow speeds… There are many many happy users out there including myself and I have two 4tb Clouds now.

I just bought my 2nd 4TB cloud yesterday and I’m currently copying from Cloud to Cloud. I got 62GB/s throughput yesterday for movie files and today I’m getting 32GB/s for photos.


#108

Raphael

What method are you using to copy files between the two My Clouuds?

RAC


#109

rac8006 wrote:

Raphael

 

What method are you using to copy files between the two My Clouuds?

 

RAC

explorer, drag and drop… 


#110

That means that each file has to be copied twice.  Once to the PC and once back to the other My Cloud.

You ever consider using a sript to copy directly from one My Cloud to the other?

RAC


#111

I think we went through a similar conversation somewhere in this post.

yes it is true that it does bring the data in then sends it back out again, but the bottleneck isn’t so much in the data routing as so much as the write speeds of the second cloud.

The max throughput is still going to be 62MB/s writes for movie files and 32MB/s writes for photos.

I also have a USB 3 drive that is full of the same data of which I could use to read in then copy over to the new Cloud but after starting up the copy, just for fun, I noticed that I got great speeds given that my previous write tests maxed out at 45MB/s so any speed that is equal or greater than 45MB/s is really a max no matter how you copy.

Anyways… this is all a one time copy. Once I backed up the old cloud (twice really, one copy is on the USB and the other copy is on the new Cloud), I’m going to upgrade my old cloud fw 3.04 to OS3.

Then what I plan to do is perhaps leave photos on one cloud and media on the other with plenty of room for future growth. Not a bad upgrade for only $160.  


#112

Hallo i have also the problems with copy speed
I use in the past Firmware 3.0 and was able to copy with SSH and “cp” from my usbdisk very fast from my USB disk to the WD cloud
But at this moment with FIRMWARE 4.0 very frustrated take hours !!.
I am in a point that i will decide to go back to firmware 3.
I notice the problem is already a long time from the begining of Firmware 4 so WHY is WD Cloud not reacting ? I saw may users reply’s but why is WD Cloud not listing
Because also make save point is terrible
Greetings Avdstege


#113

Ralphael
One simple question:
I notice that you copied from Cloud to Cloud or from Pc to Pc connected ofcourse with the Cable .
But what are you last result of copy from connected USB drive at the Cloud with the “SSH” “cp” methode direct ?
Thanks for al response.


#114

hello avdstege,

so I read your message on my iPad in bed and decided to get up and test out the ssh cp speeds tonight since I was tossing and turning anyways. :stuck_out_tongue:

On both, one is on 4.04.00-308 and the other is 3.04, the copy from USB to Cloud is 50MB/s and from Cloud to USB FW4.04.00-308 is 45MB/s and FW3.04 is 40MB/s.

I have no USB speed problems but they are My Books 4TB connected to both Clouds.

I do know that if you have a 3rd party USB drive like Vantec, the speeds can drop down by half down to 18MB/s writes and 23MB/s Reads.

This is something you have to ask WD. My guess in order to get this fixed you have to have a lot of people complaining.


#115

Hello Ralphael
Here it is not night it is here 15:00 pm.
But thanks you are coming out of your bed :).
I have a buffalo USB 3.0 drive and it was working very well as i say with firmware 3.0
Copy from the USB disk connected to the WDCLOUD with the SSH “cp” command.
But i will try also to disable first the services as you speak in the thread here.
And try again with the "time cp… " command.
Also i will test it with network copy
I keep informed about status
My Firmware is the latest because i want to use the NZBGET 15 version for Firmware 4x.
And that is working very well.


#116

I always joked that WD has this in their firmware :stuck_out_tongue:

if usb3 drive <> “Western Digital” then
repeat while not eof {
sleep 2
write
}

I have downgraded and I now speak with confidence :stuck_out_tongue: if you need to get your USB 3 speeds back, do the downgrade. There is no upgrade that has any benefits other than a few security patches (reminds me of microsoft and the numerous security patches).

good luck.


#117

Hello
I had already done a downgrade after i got him from firmware 4 to Firmware 3
But i had bricked that one with the aptget with nzbget
So i was able to get a new one by our local store due garanthee .
So i will not brick again due the install of nzbget for firmware 3.
I used then sabnzb but that one was very painfull for the memory of de unit.
I have also disable the services you mention.

But i will maybe do a try again to downgrade again to Firmware 3. Have you also then disable the services there ?


#118

Always… disabling services is the first thing I do :stuck_out_tongue:

you sound like you have everything under control.

Good luck


#119

I’m one of the blue collar, non-expert, John Q. Public types who bought a WD My Cloud mostly out of curiosity, and trying to stay on top of new technology. Here are my first impressions, and an attempt to explain previous tips in a little more detail for those who might need to know.

I could have purchased a 3 TB USB 3.0 external HDD, but I liked the idea of using Ethernet instead, with speeds potentially reaching more than 50 MB per second for GbE, and the ability to attach my three laptops to the same switch for ultrafast backups, file transfers, and VNC sessions. I didn’t buy into the idea of using this device to access files on my home computer from a remote location, or to quickly share music, movies, and videos with friends online. I simply wanted a way to synchronize, backup, and easily copy files between my two Windows 7 laptops and MacBook Pro, without having to keep plugging and unplugging an external USB HDD, and without the security risk of having my laptops and their files constantly online for unscrupulous basement dwellers to try to hack into. My only connection to the Internet is using my phone’s 4G LTE mobile hotspot. That is all I need, and as such, I don’t have a cable modem or router, and no intention of creating an online cloud. I only want a personal cloud.

I read the thread comments up to this point, and the general consensus seems to be that the WD My Cloud has the potential to transfer files quickly, but occasionally (some would say often), can be slow, finicky, unreliable, or unresponsive. Sometimes the network drops for no apparent reason. Sometimes the hard drive thrashes, trying to index all of your files. I experience these issues whenever I turn on the WDMC, but once it finally “calms down” and sees the Windows PC on the network, I’m quite pleased with its performance, especially now that I’m at typical GbE speeds.

When I first plugged in the WDMC, I was using an old 10/100 switch and ancient CAT 5e patch cables that I had scrounged from work about 10 years ago, that had probably been stepped on, run over with wheeled carts, and kinked beyond their bending radii dozens of times. File copying was much slower than with my WD Passport. I was certainly tempted to return the WDMC to the store and exchange it for a normal USB HDD, but I wanted to know how something brand new could be so slow! Could my switch and cables cause this much trouble? Looking in Start – Control Panel – Network and Sharing Center, I saw that my WDMC connection was throttled at exactly 10 Mbps. I tried manually changing the speed of the Ethernet (Marvell Yukon PCI-E Gigabit Ethernet controller) to 100 Mbps Full Duplex, but the connection wouldn’t come up. The lights stayed unlit. I switched back to Auto-Negotiation and resumed at 10 Mbps.

I switched the two patch cables with two brand new CAT 6 cables, but the speeds were still slower than my USB HDD connected to USB 2.0 ports. I was thinking of buying a Netgear GbE switch, but then I watched the videos directly or indirectly referenced in this thread, NAS 101 - Why is my WD My Cloud or other Network Drive So Slow, and Connect WD My Cloud or NAS directly to a Mac or Windows PC with Ethernet cable, and realized that I could connect the WDMC directly to my computer for the initial transfer of ~ 900 GB data from my laptops and other backup drives onto the WDMC. Afterwards, I could go buy the Netgear GbE switch to allow simultaneous connections between the WDMC and the laptops.

My first attempt to copy from the laptop to the WDMC with a direct CAT6 connection, I was going from my laptop’s slow 5400 rpm HDD, copying tons of small files, and the speed was maxing out at about 25 MB per second (about 200 Mbps). Next, I copied some gigantic 600 MB videos to my laptop’s SSD, and tried copying from the SSD to the WDMC. I was able to transfer these large files at up to 76 MB per second (about 600 Mbps) consistently! This was the best case scenario for my laptop. Probably the only ways that I could increase the speed would be to install a faster SSD or copy from a RAM drive.


When you first plug in the WDMC to a Windows 7 computer:

Start – Control Panel – Network and Sharing Center, you will probably see Unidentified Network, set for Public (most secure) mode. Click on Local Area Connection, and you will see the speed in Mbps or Gbps.

While you’re here, click on Properties – Configure – Advanced tab. Try playing around with the Ethernet controller’s Speed & Duplex setting to see if it makes any difference. Some people have recommended changing the Checksum Offload setting to disabled. If the performance suffers or the network won’t even come up, just change the settings back to what they were. Fiddling with the settings, while watching the LEDs on your Ethernet switch react in real time, clues you in as to what is happening under the surface.

Go to Windows Explorer – click in the address bar – select Network. You should eventually see three icons for WDMyCloud. You may need to wait a few minutes for all three to appear. The icon for the shared folders is typically the last one to appear.

The icon in the Media Devices category (typically the second icon, once all three icons are displayed) is for access to the My Cloud’s Twonky server. I’m not sure what this is for and I’ve never used this feature.

The icon in the Storage category (typically the third icon, once all three are displayed) is for access to the My Cloud Dashboard. One of the first things that I did was to update the firmware of the My Cloud to the most recent version. I did so manually, as follows:

Go to the WD Support website.
Click on Downloads – Product Firmware.
Select My Cloud.
Download the current firmware (Firmware Release 4.04.01-112 (10/21/2015) as of 1 Jan 2016).
Unzip and extract the file.
Now go to Windows Explorer – in the address bar, select Network – double-click on the WDMyCloud entry under Storage – this will pull up the My Cloud user interface Dashboard.
Click on Settings – Firmware – Manual Update – Update from file – point to the file that you extracted before.

For me, the My Cloud reported that it was rebooting after firmware updating completed, but nothing happened after 20 minutes of waiting. I had to reboot the device myself, and confirmed the new firmware.

The WD My Cloud has no power button. You may find this strange. Apparently, it is meant to stay running continuously, except to carry out maintenance tasks. To safely shut off or reboot the device:
Go to the Dashboard.
Click on Settings – Utilities – Device Maintenance – Shutdown, or Reboot.


The icon in the Computer category (typically the first icon, once all three are displayed) = your shared folders on the My Cloud. When you first connect directly, Windows and the WDMC will need a minute or two for the automatic 169.254 addresses to kick into gear. Once they have unique 169.254-type addresses, they can talk to each other and you should be able to see the WDMC and any shared Windows folders in your Windows Explorer – Network folder.

To see a folder from the Windows computer in the same Windows Explorer – Network window, right-click on the folder, click on Properties – Sharing tab, and create a share with appropriate permissions. You will probably have to wait a minute or two before the share appears in the Windows Explorer – Network window.

When you first double-click on the WDMyCloud icon in the Computer category, you may see, “Network discovery and file sharing are turned off. Network computers and devices are not visible. Click to change.” From there, you can change the WDMC to a Home or Work network. You will probably have to keep redoing this each time you reboot. To make this setting persistent, try one of these methods:

Start - Run – secpol.msc - Network List Manager Policies
OR
Start - Run – gpedit.msc – Computer Configuration – Windows Settings – Security Settings – Network List Manager Policies.
Make desired changes to your networks including to “Unidentified Networks”.
Start – Run - gpupdate /force.

Start - Run - regedit.
HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\NetworkList\Profiles.
Look at the Category and change the value from 0 (public) to 1 (home).

Once you are able to see your shared folders, you should see three default folders:

Public
SmartWare
TimeMachineBackup

You can create your own folders, of course. I created a folder called Documents and didn’t use the three default folders at all.


Security flaw?: Interestingly, when I set my cell phone mobile hotspot for Public mode, and shared folders on my Windows SSD and HDD to access them from the WD My Cloud in Work mode, a spurious entry called M10 showed up in Windows Explorer – Network. I double-clicked on this, thinking it was part of the WD My Cloud, but it was apparently someone else’s router on the Verizon 4G LTE network. Even though my mobile hotspot was set for Public, I could see this other person’s router, and presumably they could see my WD My Cloud and Windows 7 shared folders! (I seem to remember also seeing an error message about a duplicate IP address on the network.) From that point onward, I made sure to disconnect the hotspot whenever accessing files on the private network with the WDMC, and no longer saw the M10 icon.


If you want static 192.168-type addresses instead of autoconfigured 169.254-type addresses:
On your Windows computer, click on Start – Control Panel – Network and Sharing Center.
Click on the Local Area Connection for the WDMC, which is most likely called “Unidentified Network”.
Click on Properties – Internet Protocol Version 4 (TCP/IP v4) – Properties.
Enter in your desired IP address, subnet mask, gateway, and DNS.
I’m not sure what some of them should be, so I made educated guesses and it seemed to work fine:

IP address = 192.168.0.1
Netmask = 255.255.255.0.
Gateway = 192.168.0.1
DNS Server 1 = 192.168.0.1

The autoconfigured 169.254 network will drop as soon as you complete the IP address step.

In WDMC Dashboard, click on Settings – Network – under Network Services, turn Network Mode to Static.
Enter in your desired IP address and other details. I entered in the same as for the Windows PC, except for the WDMC’s unique IP address 192.168.0.2.

The network should come back up, with the new IP addresses, after you complete this step.

In both instances, I’m not sure if the “Gateway” and “DNS Server 1” addresses should match the IP address of the Wndows PC, or that of the WDMC, or if it even matters.

At first, I only entered in the two unique IP addresses and the subnet mask. I was able to ping the WDMC from Win7 command console (Start – Run – cmd), but the Win7 PC’s shared folder didn’t appear in the Network folder. Once I entered in values for gateway and DNS, the shared folder appeared.


To enter commands in SSH to quiet down the My Cloud’s HDD thrashing in firmware v3 (not sure if this still applies for v4?):

Download Putty on your Windows PC.
In WDMC Dashboard, click on Settings – Network – under Network Services, turn SSH on.
A window will pop up, telling you that the default SSH login is root, welc0me, and that you will be prompted to change the password after logging in.
Take note of your WDMC’s IP address. If you have an autoconfigured 169.254-type network, you can find out your WDMC’s IP address in Dashboard.
Open Putty and click on SSH, with default port 22.
Enter in the WDMC’s IP address and click Open.
You should see an SSH screen.
The interface is very slow to respond. When you type in the username and password, try to type them in very slowly and carefully, with a deliberate pause between each keystroke. When I entered them the first few times, I must have typed too quickly and SSH kept locking me out.
When you are typing in the password, the screen does not react to each keystroke and it looks like nothing is happening. Just keep typing each character.
Once you are able to log in, you will see a pound sign prompt, #. You’re in some version of Linux. Isn’t it amazing how Unix (c. 1969) and Linux (born 1991) have taken over the world? Between Android, iOS, OS X, servers, embedded devices, supercomputers, spacecraft, personal cloud drives, pretty much everything (except Windows computers) runs on something Unixlike now.

In Linux or Unix, there are some key commands that help you figure out where you are:
pwd to inform you what folder you’re in.
ls to list the contents of the folder, similar to dir in Windows Command Console.
cd to change to another folder, same as in Windows Command Console.
cd … to go up one level.
As you change folders, you will see the path displayed before the # prompt changes accordingly.
For example, if you’re at root and you cd …, then cd usr, then cd sbin, you will see:
WDMyCloud:/usr/sbin#

Commands mentioned in previous threads:
/etc/init.d/wdmcserverd stop
/etc/init.d/wdphotodbmergerd stop
update-rc.d wdphotodbmergerd disable
update-rc.d wdmcserverd disable

The wdmcserverd and wdphotodbmergerd files are in /etc/init.d, and the update-rc.d file is in /usr/sbin.

When I navigated to the /etc/init.d folder and typed wdmcserverd stop, I saw “-bash wdmcserverd command not found”. I had to navigate back to root, and type in /etc/init.d/wdmcserverd stop. Then I saw “[ok] stopping wdmcserver.”

Then I typed in update-rc.d wdmcserverd disable, and saw:

Disabling system startup links for /etc/init.d/wdmcserverd …
Removing any system startup links for /etc/init.d/wdmcserverd …
Adding system startup for /etc/init.d/wdmcserverd …

Just out of curiosity, when I typed in update-rc.d wdmcserverd enable, I saw almost the same:

Enabling system startup links for /etc/init.d/wdmcserverd …
Removing any system startup links for /etc/init.d/wdmcserverd …
Adding system startup for /etc/init.d/wdmcserverd …

I re-stopped and re-disabled wdmcserverd, and carried out the same process (stop, then disable) for wdphotodbmergerd.

I can’t tell if the SSH commands, mentioned in this thread, accomplished anything for me, on firmware version 4. The WDMC sounds nearly the same now as it did before. There isn’t much thrashing except (1) when I first boot or re-power the device, before it calms down, and (2) when I disconnect the Ethernet cable and don’t reconnect right away. If I disconnect the cable and come back an hour later, the LED is usually white and the HDD is thrashing – and when I plug the cable back in, the network takes a longggggg time to come up fully. As long as I leave the cable connected to the PC, the LED stays blue, the drive remains relatively quiet, and the network stays intact.


#120

good job in your post EM1336. WD needs all the help the customers can give it :stuck_out_tongue: