Router advice


#1

I am having streaming problems with mkv files as well as other regular movie files.

I have also been losing network connectivity to my Qnap drive and have to reset it frequently.

The router I have is a Draytek Vigor 2100N. This does not have gigabit ethernet ports. Do you feel the router should be changed ? Is theDIR-655 Xtreme N Gigabit Router a better option or can u suggest any other ?


#2

I’d think you’d need to look into what’s causing your network issues.

You certainly don’t need gigabit ethernet to stream video files.  I have a 12-year old WRT-54G that works fine between my PC and my WDTV… a 20Mbit 1080p .mkv file should play fine over a 100Mbit Cat5 line.  You’ll exceed what the WDTV can play back long before you get anywhere close to saturating a 100Mbit line.


#3

Do you think it could be a HDMI cable problem ? I was recommended and am using a  HDMI 1.4 cable .


#4

To help you further you need to provide more details.

  1. Is this wireless or wired?

  2. How long of a run is the wd tv device to your qnap?

I’m guessing you are trying to do this all wireless. Then your ethernet port speed is moot. If you are trying to do this with wireless to the wd tv device, and wired to your qnap. Your limiting factor is going to be the wireless. I would guess you have some kinda of interfence issue. (too much concrete, radio signal is getting obscured/dispersed).


#5

i have a router in one room and i have a set of Panasonic BL-PA 100 adapters ( http://panasonic.net/pcc/products/plc/lineup/blpa100_100kt/index.html),,) 4 to be precise.

One master and three slaves. Out of the three slaves only one is hot at any given time, the other two being dormant.

Before I got the WDTV I was using the same cable and same setup for my PS3 and never had any problems. Its only with the WDTV that I am getting freeze problems. So my setup is wired and not wireless.


#6

This directly off Panasonic’s website

http://panasonic.net/pcc/products/plc/lineup/blpa100_100kt/index.html

Fast, comfortable communication of high-volume data. At a theoretical maximum transmission speed of 190 Mbps, the system is faster than a wireless LAN system, even when comparing actual system speeds. Also, a simple speed measurement function*1 shows the communication speed between Master and Terminal units.*2 The speed is measured by simply pressing a button on the Terminal, so you can easily find which power outlets give you the highest communication speed for a more comfortable network environment. You no longer have to feel frustrated because of slow data transmission.

*1 The indicated speed is only valid for the moment at which it was measured. It does not imply that the indicated speed will continue.

*2 It does not indicate the communications speed between Terminals.

The first caveat is the most important. The speed does not indicate this will continue… panasonic is stating this. This means some other device is pulling power throught that exact circuit, the device will drop netwrok connection.

So I dont’ think a new router will increase your streaming performance. I believe you problem lies in the fact that you are using inline-power for networking. All the specs on panasonic’s website talk about max theorical. It does not talk about sustained throughput. With streaming we care much more about sustainable data transmission rate.

I hope this helps a bit.


#7

Thank you very much for taking time to read about my problem. I also have a set of these with me. http://www.devolo.co.uk/consumer/77_dlan-200-av-wireless-n_starter-kit_product-presentation_1.html?l=en

Do you think these will be better. Or what else do you suggest I do ?


#8

It’s what this community is made for!!!

I would avoid inline-power all together. You have a better bet with doing pure wireless. Inline power is so succeptable to packet loss, as any time some other device on that specific power circuit requires power it will interupt the data stream. At least with wirelss only another radio signal can interfer with the data stream plus there is also a big buffer built into the wireless protocol that it is not so succeptable to packet loss. Wireless is alot more forgiving when it comes to packet loss. Inline power is a hack of pure ethernet, without the buffers of wireless. There is literally no benefit to inline power other than range.

The best way to do it by far is use ethernet, as it has much superior throughput, security, and reliablity. Typically ethernet will just work, nor not… there is no inbetween like wireless/inline power.


#9

Nathan7545 wrote:

It’s what this community is made for!!!

 

I would avoid inline-power all together. You have a better bet with doing pure wireless. Inline power is so succeptable to packet loss, as any time some other device on that specific power circuit requires power it will interupt the data stream. At least with wirelss only another radio signal can interfer with the data stream plus there is also a big buffer built into the wireless protocol that it is not so succeptable to packet loss. Wireless is alot more forgiving when it comes to packet loss. Inline power is a hack of pure ethernet, without the buffers of wireless. There is literally no benefit to inline power other than range.

 

The best way to do it by far is use ethernet, as it has much superior throughput, security, and reliablity. Typically ethernet will just work, nor not… there is no inbetween like wireless/inline power.

 

 

I don’t know where you got that information from? I have absolutely no problem with powerline adaptors. They are much better than wireless and just as good as direct ethernet connection. Have you ever used modern powerline adaptors?


#10

wow, two contradictions. Which brand of powerline adapters are you using ?


#11

Well, Nathan is being just a bit alarmist.   HomePlugAV is pretty reliable these days.   It’s certainly not BULLETPROOF, but depending on many factors, it can be much more consistent and reliable than WiFi…

I have three WD LiveWires on my network, and they’re fairly trouble free.   They ocassionally require an unplug/replug, but that’s been twice in the last month.


#12

I’m running 2 WD Livewires: one connects to router, the other connects to the Live, an Xbox and my AVR. 

So far it’s been trouble-free.  It’s not the fastest connection in the world at less than 3MB/sec (and in all honesty I have a Belkin wifi-N dongle that’s up to 2x faster) but it’s an easy way to network multiple devices simultaneously around my home entertainment unit.

I can stream 1080p content from the media server on my NAS… so, unless you have really bad wiring or faulty units, it should be good enough for your needs.


#13

richUK wrote:

 


Nathan7545 wrote:

It’s what this community is made for!!!

 

I would avoid inline-power all together. You have a better bet with doing pure wireless. Inline power is so succeptable to packet loss, as any time some other device on that specific power circuit requires power it will interupt the data stream. At least with wirelss only another radio signal can interfer with the data stream plus there is also a big buffer built into the wireless protocol that it is not so succeptable to packet loss. Wireless is alot more forgiving when it comes to packet loss. Inline power is a hack of pure ethernet, without the buffers of wireless. There is literally no benefit to inline power other than range.

 

The best way to do it by far is use ethernet, as it has much superior throughput, security, and reliablity. Typically ethernet will just work, nor not… there is no inbetween like wireless/inline power.

 

 


I don’t know where you got that information from? I have absolutely no problem with powerline adaptors. They are much better than wireless and just as good as direct ethernet connection. Have you ever used modern powerline adaptors?

 

If you are in the UK. Then you have a completely and utterly incomparable power system to the US power system. In the UK you run 240 volts at 50 hz. US uses 120 volts at 60 hz. US uses radial circuit designs, where as the UK uses ring circuit design.  So it’s not very fair to say that if it works for you, then it should work for the rest of the world.

I’m just saying that if he’s having a problem, it’s probably due to a wiring quirk. He probably should go with a wireless solution, because he can throw tons of time at trying to get the WD tv device to work properly and get no where. I personally use a Cisco 1250 WAP with a linksys N usb adapter into my WD and can stream mkv/m2ts at 30Mb/s resolution with no issues.

He’s seeking router advice, and his problem is not the router it’s the way the data is being transmitted. So telling him to buy a new router will not solve his problem, trying wireless may be a solution. But arguing if inline power adapter works  or not doesn’t solve the issue that his WD device doesn’t work well.

That’s my opinion… YMMV


#14

Hi Nathan, I appreciate your input and am more than willing to try the wireless option and am about to buy a USB wifi N adapter.  Will revert when have tried it. Hope it really solves the problem.


#15

Nathan7545 wrote:

 


richUK wrote:

 


Nathan7545 wrote:

It’s what this community is made for!!!

 

I would avoid inline-power all together. You have a better bet with doing pure wireless. Inline power is so succeptable to packet loss, as any time some other device on that specific power circuit requires power it will interupt the data stream. At least with wirelss only another radio signal can interfer with the data stream plus there is also a big buffer built into the wireless protocol that it is not so succeptable to packet loss. Wireless is alot more forgiving when it comes to packet loss. Inline power is a hack of pure ethernet, without the buffers of wireless. There is literally no benefit to inline power other than range.

 

The best way to do it by far is use ethernet, as it has much superior throughput, security, and reliablity. Typically ethernet will just work, nor not… there is no inbetween like wireless/inline power.

 

 


I don’t know where you got that information from? I have absolutely no problem with powerline adaptors. They are much better than wireless and just as good as direct ethernet connection. Have you ever used modern powerline adaptors?

 


 

If you are in the UK. Then you have a completely and utterly incomparable power system to the US power system. In the UK you run 240 volts at 50 hz. US uses 120 volts at 60 hz. US uses radial circuit designs, where as the UK uses ring circuit design.  So it’s not very fair to say that if it works for you, then it should work for the rest of the world.

I’m just saying that if he’s having a problem, it’s probably due to a wiring quirk. He probably should go with a wireless solution, because he can throw tons of time at trying to get the WD tv device to work properly and get no where. I personally use a Cisco 1250 WAP with a linksys N usb adapter into my WD and can stream mkv/m2ts at 30Mb/s resolution with no issues.

 

He’s seeking router advice, and his problem is not the router it’s the way the data is being transmitted. So telling him to buy a new router will not solve his problem, trying wireless may be a solution. But arguing if inline power adapter works  or not doesn’t solve the issue that his WD device doesn’t work well.

That’s my opinion… YMMV

I don’t disagree with your general advice but I do disagree with your opinion regarding powerline adaptors particularly when you don’t know where the poster lives. If you note the original poster gave a link to a UK website for the powerline adaptors therefore I assume that he lives in the UK. Given that there are only a small amount of channels for WiFi and a large amount of people using those channels I have found that powerline is much more reliable and faster than WiFi (In the UK). Obviously ethernet cabling would be the best way to go.

18pcs

If you buy a WiFi adaptor don’t forget to buy an approved one with the correct version / revision number. The WDTV only supports certain adaptors and its reportedly difficult to buy the correct one.

Approved list here.

http://wdc.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/3805


#16

richUK wrote:

 


Nathan7545 wrote:

 


richUK wrote:

 


Nathan7545 wrote:

It’s what this community is made for!!!

 

I would avoid inline-power all together. You have a better bet with doing pure wireless. Inline power is so succeptable to packet loss, as any time some other device on that specific power circuit requires power it will interupt the data stream. At least with wirelss only another radio signal can interfer with the data stream plus there is also a big buffer built into the wireless protocol that it is not so succeptable to packet loss. Wireless is alot more forgiving when it comes to packet loss. Inline power is a hack of pure ethernet, without the buffers of wireless. There is literally no benefit to inline power other than range.

 

The best way to do it by far is use ethernet, as it has much superior throughput, security, and reliablity. Typically ethernet will just work, nor not… there is no inbetween like wireless/inline power.

 

 


I don’t know where you got that information from? I have absolutely no problem with powerline adaptors. They are much better than wireless and just as good as direct ethernet connection. Have you ever used modern powerline adaptors?

 


 

If you are in the UK. Then you have a completely and utterly incomparable power system to the US power system. In the UK you run 240 volts at 50 hz. US uses 120 volts at 60 hz. US uses radial circuit designs, where as the UK uses ring circuit design.  So it’s not very fair to say that if it works for you, then it should work for the rest of the world.

I’m just saying that if he’s having a problem, it’s probably due to a wiring quirk. He probably should go with a wireless solution, because he can throw tons of time at trying to get the WD tv device to work properly and get no where. I personally use a Cisco 1250 WAP with a linksys N usb adapter into my WD and can stream mkv/m2ts at 30Mb/s resolution with no issues.

 

He’s seeking router advice, and his problem is not the router it’s the way the data is being transmitted. So telling him to buy a new router will not solve his problem, trying wireless may be a solution. But arguing if inline power adapter works  or not doesn’t solve the issue that his WD device doesn’t work well.

That’s my opinion… YMMV


 

I don’t disagree with your general advice but I do disagree with your opinion regarding powerline adaptors particularly when you don’t know where the poster lives. If you note the original poster gave a link to a UK website for the powerline adaptors therefore I assume that he lives in the UK. Given that there are only a small amount of channels for WiFi and a large amount of people using those channels I have found that powerline is much more reliable and faster than WiFi (In the UK). Obviously ethernet cabling would be the best way to go.

 

18pcs

 

If you buy a WiFi adaptor don’t forget to buy an approved one with the correct version / revision number. The WDTV only supports certain adaptors and its reportedly difficult to buy the correct one.

 

Approved list here.

 

http://wdc.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/3805

You are right I didn’t even think about where the poster lives. I have pretty horrible results with them using them in fairly modern US homes (1950’s+). I am not a big fan of them, as I have yet to see one work reliable without dropping the data stream. I have tried them in numerous homes, and I have always gone to a wireless solution.  I always recommend using 5 channels away from the strong WiFi signal out there


#17

Sorry for not clarifying, but I live in Warsaw, Poland


#18

18pcs wrote:

Sorry for not clarifying, but I live in Warsaw, Poland

A wrong assumption on my part then. :wink:

Did you get a WiFi adaptor?


#19

Yes have ordered a TP-LINK TL-WN821NC


#20

18pcs wrote:

Yes have ordered a TP-LINK TL-WN821NC

Lets hope you get one that works. Some users have reported that this adaptor has been updated to a new version which does not work with the WDTV.

http://community.wdc.com/t5/Networking/wd-tv-live-TP-Link-TL-WN821NC/m-p/129960/highlight/true#M6058