Streaming 1080p is choppy and sound is lost


#1

Hi there

I have the WD TV Live connected by ethernet to  this router and my computer is on a 4 bar signal upstairs via a n band Belkin usb dongle. The partition of the drives are NTFS (does that make a major difference?) and I never use the network while streaming. I also share the files via the windows permissions like in this tutorial When i start any film it is perfect for the first minute or so, but then stops and gets choppy. I always use mkvs too and they work fine if I attach the usb drive directly to the WD TV Live. I’ve also tried sharing the file from my primary operating drive, c:/ .

I’ve read that changing the file system to ext2 or ext3 would help? Is it really necessary to change a file system in order to stream 1080p films?

Any help would be appreciated and if you require any other info let me know.


#2

Hello,

This issue happens with all type of files? or only with MKV’s?


#3

Running a dlna media server like serviio on your computer can often help with stuttering, it’s free so worth a try


#4

I’ll try out Serviio and post my results.

I don’t know if it stutters with WMV files but it doesn’t stutter with mp3, avi, divx etc.

Thanks :slight_smile:


#5

The serviio people get upset when someone posts their experience with serviio.

I consulted a friend who works in a computer department where there are over 2000 PC’s in use, specialised networking and competent professional support staff. They have a dedicated professional state of the art video editing centre using the latest technology. The centre is used to train students in professional video editing. I doubt that the average user would possess or have access to the technology or networking centre.

My friend did a mathematical calculation on the limitations of using a 100mbps LAN to stream video. There are also professional software tools to verify the LAN speed. The bottleneck is not in the DLNA server software regardless of whether it is freeware, open source or commercial. In fact the DLNA software inbuilt into Windows 7 exhibits identical problems as serviio streaming video through a 100mbps LAN. In view that Microsoft wrote Windows 7 to be used in a professional environment, I doubt Microsoft would display any software incompetence.

I am using the following DLNA Devices:    Sony BDP S-370 bluray player Australia (EU profile); WDTV Live - WDXTV 1.03.49; 0.4.5.3; Samsung PS50C550 plasma TV.

The LAN used for video is a TP-Link TG-3269 1000mbps card connected to a Netgear GS605 5 port switch using manufactured cat 6 cables. The video LAN, media switch and DLNA devices are connected independently of the internet LAN. There is no network sharing of files or communication activity between the two LAN networks.

Seviio will stream DVD VOB files to all three DLNA devices without stutter.

Serviio will stream some bluray media through the WDTV Live without stutter. The reference bluray used was Pirates of the Caribbean 3.

Serviio will not stream bluray media through the Sony bluray player or Samsung TV without stutter. The reference bluray used was Pirates of the Caribbean 3.

Observing the Windows 7 Task Manager, the maximum CPU use when streaming bluray video is about 40% with 50% maximum memory use. The TP-Link TG-3269 1000mbps maximum use is 2%. My conclusion is that the 100mbps ports on the Sony bluray player and Samsung TV are good enough to stream DVD video but not fast enough to stream bluray video. The WDTV Live will stream DVD video. Depending on the bluray disk title, the WDTV Live may stream some of the bluray disk content without stuttering.

The bottleneck is not in my computer. The computer idles waiting for the information to be inputted from the 100mbps LAN within the consumer device. The only way to stop video stuttering is for the manufacturers to install a memory buffer in the 100mbps LAN or change to a 1000mpbs LAN. Until then be happy watching transcoded video.


#6

thepanoguy wrote:

The serviio people get upset when someone posts their experience with serviio.

 

I consulted a friend who works in a computer department where there are over 2000 PC’s in use, specialised networking and competent professional support staff. They have a dedicated professional state of the art video editing centre using the latest technology. The centre is used to train students in professional video editing. I doubt that the average user would possess or have access to the technology or networking centre.

 

My friend did a mathematical calculation on the limitations of using a 100mbps LAN to stream video. There are also professional software tools to verify the LAN speed. The bottleneck is not in the DLNA server software regardless of whether it is freeware, open source or commercial. In fact the DLNA software inbuilt into Windows 7 exhibits identical problems as serviio streaming video through a 100mbps LAN. In view that Microsoft wrote Windows 7 to be used in a professional environment, I doubt Microsoft would display any software incompetence.

 

I am using the following DLNA Devices:    Sony BDP S-370 bluray player Australia (EU profile); WDTV Live - WDXTV 1.03.49; 0.4.5.3; Samsung PS50C550 plasma TV.

 

The LAN used for video is a TP-Link TG-3269 1000mbps card connected to a Netgear GS605 5 port switch using manufactured cat 6 cables. The video LAN, media switch and DLNA devices are connected independently of the internet LAN. There is no network sharing of files or communication activity between the two LAN networks.

 

Seviio will stream DVD VOB files to all three DLNA devices without stutter.

 

Serviio will stream some bluray media through the WDTV Live without stutter. The reference bluray used was Pirates of the Caribbean 3.

 

Serviio will not stream bluray media through the Sony bluray player or Samsung TV without stutter. The reference bluray used was Pirates of the Caribbean 3.

 

Observing the Windows 7 Task Manager, the maximum CPU use when streaming bluray video is about 40% with 50% maximum memory use. The TP-Link TG-3269 1000mbps maximum use is 2%. My conclusion is that the 100mbps ports on the Sony bluray player and Samsung TV are good enough to stream DVD video but not fast enough to stream bluray video. The WDTV Live will stream DVD video. Depending on the bluray disk title, the WDTV Live may stream some of the bluray disk content without stuttering.

 

The bottleneck is not in my computer. The computer idles waiting for the information to be inputted from the 100mbps LAN within the consumer device. The only way to stop video stuttering is for the manufacturers to install a memory buffer in the 100mbps LAN or change to a 1000mpbs LAN. Until then be happy watching transcoded video.

Sounds really good on paper, not how it really works in real life, some gigabit Lan can be not much better than a good 100meg Lan when you take in all the limitations on the Lan cards and how the rates can travel once passed the Lan card.

That bit above in red, not sure why but that got me laughing :smileyvery-happy:


#7

Consumer grade computers are manufactured with sloppy buss timing tolerances. Windows was designed as a single user, multitasking system, therefore Windows can tolerate sloppy buss timing tolerances. Sloppy buss timing tolerances have been documented by Linux networking professionals. That is why you will find that any company building and selling professional server and network equipment will only use certified motherboards and networking components.

I don’t think that anyone employed as a software programmer deliberately designs buggy software. I think the issue is that there are a core group of people who will push the limitation of computer technology to the limit. In the process they reveal the limitation of the programming.

Unfortunately manufacturers will not disclose circuit diagrams or the full technical performance of their equipment. Therefore we can only assume performance figures. Based on the manufacturing techniques and CPU speed grading used by Intel, it can be assumed that some of the DLNS devices will operate at a faster speed than another identical model number DLNS device. That would explain why people posting on forums report varying results.


#8

thepanoguy wrote:

The serviio people get upset when someone posts their experience with serviio.

 

I would have put that down to the way you tried to express yourself towards them :smiley:

You and your mate need to be looking a bit more deeply into DLNA and what it is for before any of your conclusions can be taken seriously, all your comments so far just compare network speeds and not relate to DLNA, it’s limitations and what DLNA is all about.


#9

http://code.google.com/p/ps3mediaserver/

Get the Beta version, and it streams to WD Live Plus with no issues! It’s meant for the PS3, but looks like they are including other devices.

I tried Serviio and it was stuttering on my MKV still. Switched to PS3MediaServer and I’m able to play anything now.