CAN or CANNOT I play HD movies in WD TV live streaming wirelessly from NAS/WD Mybook Live?

CAN or CANNOT I play HD movies in WD TV live streaming wirelessly from NAS/WD Mybook Live ?

My Room settings:

WD Mybook Live 2TB -> cable -> Router Buffalo WHR-G125 -> wireless -> WD TV Live Streaming

Sorry to be obtuse, but the answer isn’t such a simple Yes or No.

The answer is “It depends.”

The SMP and the My Book Live are both up to the task,  but it depends on if your wireless network is good enough.

The WD will need up to 50-60 megabits per second “assured” bandwidth to reliably stream HD content.

I would doubt that your setup will handle it since the WHR-G125 is only 802.11g, and can handle a MAXIMUM of 54 megabits per second in stellar conditions.

You need a very clean 802.11n network to reliably stream HD video.

Hey there, I just recently purchased a WD TV Live streaming this weekend for htis purpose, and let me tell you it has been fantastic so far.

I use Plex to manage my entire media library on a Deaktop PC connected via wireless to a Linksys E1000 router.

On my WD TV Live, I chose ‘Media Servers’ under the file location options. I then navigated to my media, and found a 1080p .mkv file (a 5GB Planet Earth file). I hit play and it instantly started up on my home network, no transcoding necessary (which is what caused this same file to buffer on my Xbox 360). I have my WD TV LIve plugged in via ethernet to my router.

That being said, it all depends on the file transfer speed of you NAS and the speed of your wireless network, but it should work fine

TonyPh12345 wrote:

Sorry to be obtuse, but the answer isn’t such a simple Yes or No.

 

The answer is “It depends.”

 

The SMP and the My Book Live are both up to the task,  but it depends on if your wireless network is good enough.

 

The WD will need up to 50-60 megabits per second “assured” bandwidth to reliably stream HD content.

 

I would doubt that your setup will handle it since the WHR-G125 is only 802.11g, and can handle a MAXIMUM of 54 megabits per second in stellar conditions.

 

You need a very clean 802.11n network to reliably stream HD video.

 

Ok. So in order for this setup to work flawlessly, you want me to change my router to a newer one N version right?

I will change to a newer N model Buffalo router, but there are 2 choices in the market:

  1. 150mbps

  2. 300mbps

However, I think I need to know first, does anyone knows what is the maximum wifi speed of this WD TV Live ??

Since I knew most small usb adapter have only maximum speed of 150mbps, and especially if this WD TV Live do have only max speed of 150mbps, then I really have no point to buy 300mbps router, right?

And when you state I need 50-60 mbps, are you referring to 720p or 1080p ?

One of local store staff who sells WD products, said that the WDTV Mybook Live (NAS) can stream HD movies directly and at the same time up to 3 WD TV Live… I wonder is this true? lol

kryptykk wrote:

Hey there, I just recently purchased a WD TV Live streaming this weekend for htis purpose, and let me tell you it has been fantastic so far.

 

I use Plex to manage my entire media library on a Deaktop PC connected via wireless to a Linksys E1000 router.

 

On my WD TV Live, I chose ‘Media Servers’ under the file location options. I then navigated to my media, and found a 1080p .mkv file (a 5GB Planet Earth file). I hit play and it instantly started up on my home network, no transcoding necessary (which is what caused this same file to buffer on my Xbox 360). I have my WD TV LIve plugged in via ethernet to my router.

 

That being said, it all depends on the file transfer speed of you NAS and the speed of your wireless network, but it should work fine

What if, you try to connect desktop pc to router with ethernet cable, THEN connecting wd tv live to router via wireless ?

Anyone else ?? Am I the only one on this planet to have this idea of streaming hd movies over wireless ?

SultanBrunei wrote:

 

Ok. So in order for this setup to work flawlessly, you want me to change my router to a newer one N version right?

You’re asking a question that is impossible to answer.

There’s so much about Wireless Networking that is completely out of your control.   There’s not a (sane) person on this planet that will guarantee you any specific performance.

I think I’m probably the only person who has run an objective throughput test on the SMP

you can search the forum for “bandwidth_test” and you’ll find some results

you need to get a solid N router 300Mbps and you need to be able to properly set it up

when above he states 50 - 60 Mbps, we’re talking about actual throughput

my first test on this device was using a Linksys E3000 over 2.4 ghz

I was only able to relyably achieve 45 Mbps

then I tested some old powerline adaptors I have and relyably achieved 55 Mbps (powerline max was 100 Mbps)

recently I grabbed an Asus RT-AC66U

and am now getting 110 Mbps actual throughput

it should also be noted that even with the same hardware

wireless throughput is heavily dependant on distance from router, and your set up environment

how many walls the signal must pass through

interference in your area

etc …

Concur with most of what’s said here.  Although, before upgrading my router to an ASUS gigabit, dual-band N router, I was using my trusty ol’ Linksys WRT54G router w/ max wireless G of 54mbps.  I had no problems streaming anything other than some HD MKV files from BD discs (often had stuttering via wired or wireless) but the DVD ISO files worked great.

But, house is CAT5 wired, so I never use wireless if I don’t have to, to stream to PCs or TVs – only to iPad.  So, because of iPad, (that is dual-band)  is one reason I upgraded to the new router.  Upgraded all network switches to gigabit, so entire wired network is running gigabit – for my devices that can, too.  For my second WD Plus unit, I have to use wireless, so got a $10, 300mbps N adapter for it.  Streams fine.

Today, with all the network improvements I have made, I can successfully stream ISO files, MKV, and even DVDs to the iPad with the assist of the VLC Streamer app.  About the only problems now are that the actual VLC program and/or VLC Streamer app have troubles playing certain of these files. (Hey, one app is free, the other cost two bucks, so what’s to complain about!)   Nonetheless, home (and remote) media streaming has come a long way in a relative short time period.