Windows 7 & 8 Windows Shares Invalid User and Password

I have a WDTVLive SMP, a Win 7 Home Premium, and Win 8 Pro PC.  I do not require a User password for Windows on startup. I had problems with WDTVLive SMP Network Windows Shares accepting the WDTVLive default user and password.  I would get a message indicating  the User and Password  was incorrect for the selected Windows Share. A reboot would fix the problem temporarily. 

Solution: I found that disabling the Local Group Security Option “Accounts: Limit local account use of blank passwords to console logon only”  was a more permanent solution.

Here are the Windows 7 and 8 Local Group Security Option changes for a user with no Windows password:

For Windows 7 & 8 Pro:

  1. Open Local Security Policy under Control panel / Administrative tools

  2. Select Security Settings / Local Policies / Security Options

  3. Find policy Accounts: Limit local account use of blank passwords to console logon only

  4. Change its value to Disabled

Windows 7 Home edition:

The above settings will not be available; you will have to edit your registry instead (using regedit.exe), although it is recommended for experienced users only.

  1. Find key HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\Lsa\LimitBlankPasswordUse

  2. Change its value from 1 to 0.

Alternatives:

1.You can run the service under another user or the Local System account (it might cause problems with file

sharing and FFmpeg execution). 

  1. Change your current user to have a password.

I came across this yesterday after setting up a dual boot Win7/Win8. My Win7 boot has a user with a password so the "anonymous’ login would work. The Win8 boot has a user without password and I got the same error message that you got. Even after adding a password I still could not get the “anonymous” login to work. I had to use the User name on the account with the password. This now created a problem because I had different login creditials on each machine and I wanted one common login for the SMP.

I’ll try your method out later today.

Thanks! 

Had my WDTV Live for guess a couple of years now. The Windows Share has never worked. Definitely not with Windows 7 anyway. All my other computers and devices…sooooo easy to share files. WDTV…this feature is a fail. They should just get rid of that feature if they aren’t going to fix it.  I’ll tinker with it every few months when I’m bored. Always get the “invalid username”…etc. Honestly, this thing is a pretty good toy for Netflix and Shoutcast, and playing files off a usb stick. Network streaming has never been this device’s strongpoint. Really for all the time spent restarting the thing when a movie freezes, unplugging, replugging, and tinkering, you come out cheaper putting the $80 this costs towards building a little ole $500-$600 HTPC

roscolo wrote:

Had my WDTV Live for guess a couple of years now. The Windows Share has never worked. Definitely not with Windows 7 anyway. All my other computers and devices…sooooo easy to share files. WDTV…this feature is a fail. They should just get rid of that feature if they aren’t going to fix it.  I’ll tinker with it every few months when I’m bored. Always get the “invalid username”…etc. Honestly, this thing is a pretty good toy for Netflix and Shoutcast, and playing files off a usb stick. Network streaming has never been this device’s strongpoint. Really for all the time spent restarting the thing when a movie freezes, unplugging, replugging, and tinkering, you come out cheaper putting the $80 this costs towards building a little ole $500-$600 HTPC

I’m going to call you out on this. It does work with Windows 7 shares. If you’re not getting it to work then it’s on your end. Learn how to set up shares for Windows 7.

Same here, Win 7 network shares worked from day one. On a newly installed system I never had to tweak any settings, I simply connected as the user I log in with at my PC.

Windows Share has never worked for me (Win 7, 64bit). And it’s never worked for most folks, not reliably anyway. Just google - WDTV live windows share windows 7 - mucho problems for most. All my other computers and devices all share / swap / stream files on my network just fine with quick and easy set up. WDTV? Nope! Glad you 2 got it working on yours.

WDTV is a cool thing, and does streaming, eh, let’s say reasonably well “most” of the time. For what it cost, it’s OK. Hardly a reliable media streamer, though, with or without Windows Share. Performs much better when you stick to Netflix, Shoutcast, Pandora or attached storage, especially when you need subtitles. I have enjoyed mine (except for the speed, the freezes, the restarts…ugh!) but hindsight is 20/20 and I just wish I had spent the $$$ and more importantly TIME on the WDTV (let’s face it…this thing is s-l-o-w) towards a good HTPC, especially now that a Shuttle HTPC with Sandy Bridge processor, onboard video, and SSD can have idle power draw of 30-40w and just blows away the WDTV to do all the things you really wish the WDTV could do: web browse, play online content. If someone made a device like WDTV that played all the formats WDTV does (WDTV rules the roost in this respect) AND had a web browser that reliably played online content at a $100-$150 price point it could do well. Maybe not, though, as most phones and tablets that most of us have anyway outperform WDTV now, so maybe not. My WDTV will freeze up, and you never know when it will happen, and we’ve all had it happen, so I end up just plugging my TV into the HDMI port on my tablet and use my tablet to stream content as much or more than my WDTV. I use WDTV mostly just for netflix and shoutcast at this point. It does those things very well.

roscolo wrote:
Performs much better when you stick to Netflix, Shoutcast, Pandora or attached storage, especially when you need subtitles.

Is that so? From my experience local subs (PGS, VobSub, SRT) work rather well compared to Streaming subs, at least according to the reports here.

@roscolo said:

Had my WDTV Live for guess a couple of years now. The Windows Share has never worked. Definitely not with Windows 7 anyway. All my other computers and devices…sooooo easy to share files. WDTV…this feature is a fail. They should just get rid of that feature if they aren’t going to fix it.  I’ll tinker with it every few months when I’m bored. Always get the “invalid username”…etc


Interesting, this was only your second post here, and you come in to tell us Windows shares never worked with Win 7 and a WDTV for you or just about anybody?  You are totally out of order, because I, and lot of other people here know it DOES work, and it works fine – if it is all set up properly, which obviously your system is not! 

Instead of coming on like a know-it-all, if you had just asked the community nicely HOW you could get Win 7 shares and the WDTV to co-exist and how to get rid of that “invalid username”…etc.", you would have received a brief answer that you simply “do this, and do that” and it will all work like it is supposed to.

Look, I have WDTV, and Roku units, and you definitely ought to buy a Roku (a good, yet total no-brainer streaming media player) and forget about setting up something as “complicated” as a WDTV.

I only replied to you so that any noobies reading this thread don’t buy into the rubbish you put forth in here.  Sharing a WDTV on a network and with Windows machines works fine.  End of story.

@TechFlaws: Streaming sub problems is what I’m referring to. Sorry if I didn’t make that clear. Using attached storage, .srt’s usually work fine.

@mike27: Uh, Google don’t lie bro. Neither do the forum users here. Do the search. Lots of results like this one:

http://community.wdc.com/t5/WD-TV-Live-Streaming-Discussions/WD-does-not-see-Windows-Shares-Win-7-Prof/td-p/341433

Windows Share doesn’t work for many / most and, yeah, it’s a pain at best. Works for some, definitely doesn’t work for others depending on your set-up. Or maybe WD does those firmware updates just for fun, lol. And no, I’m not editing my registry just to watch movies. Install a media server. Problem solved. Funny how in that thread most users ended up installing a media server or buying/building a NAS or HTPC after wasting hours or days. But you obviously missed the larger point. Yeah, the WDTV made sense 2-3 years ago (when I bought mine, thank you), but not now. Sure, if it worked flawlessly it might be. But the Windows Shares is just the tip of the iceberg. Subtitles over network stream? Maybe, sometimes. MLB Network? Ouch…don’t even get me started. Reliable streaming? Your WDTV has never frozen or crashed? Stand proud and stand alone, amigo. Guess you better read more forum posts here. That’s what most of the posts are about. The very basic functionality of a WDTV can be had in a $200 tablet now…or for most, your phone. Things that most of us already have. 2 years ago most of these things could not do what WDTV does, certainly not at the cheap price point they are today. Snagged an Asus TF300T for $200, hook up via HDMI and it blows the WDTV away. No crash, no freeze, subtitles, plays more formats, and way faster.

You missed the point, dude. For the “noobies” researching this device (or a Roku or any of these cheapo boxes) your $60-$90 is better spent putting your hard earned $$$ towards a real HTPC solution. Will you spend a little more? Yeah. Probably $300 - $600. Subtract the $80 wasted on a cheapo media box and that cost comes down to $220 - $520. Taking the cheapskate route? Get you a cheap tablet for just a little more than a WDTV without all the wasted time. You won’t waste hours unplugging / replugging your WDTV, reconnecting, etc. All the stuff you can just read here on the forums. And you will be able to BROWSE THE WEB and play the content you find there. And that’s not noob advice. Been using my WDTV for over 2 years. Use it with attached storage for best results. And Netflix. Want to watch internet streaming content? Forget it. Build an HTPC now…or be a cheapskate like I was, blow $80 on a WDTV or Roku, and after having your movie freeze at just the wrong time for the umpteenth time and unplug and replug, all the stuff we have all dealt with, THEN break down and build your HTPC and chalk the $80 wasted on WDTV or Roku to “learning experience.” With onboard video capabilities of CPU (Sandy, Ivy) power draw of an HTPC is now negligible, and that was the only real advantage WDTV ever had.

Still using my WDTV for Shoutcast and Netflix. Reliable for that…and that’s about it. That’s sage advice from an experienced owner of a WDTV and a HTPC. Build the HTPC now…or build it later. The choice is yours. If you’re happy with your choice, cheers. I’m happy with mine.

roscolo, you sure don’t understand what motivates people to post on the web, do you?  You think because some search turns up a couple of dozen people having problem X with some device that that represents “everyone’s” experience with it?  Google don’t lie bro?  Well in fact it does if you use the existence of a few “having problems” posts to judge frequency…  Why would somebody register on this forum just to post that their device works as intended?  They wouldn’t.  What I take away from the quite small number of people posting serious problems on this forum relative to the thousands of devices that must have been sold is the opposite of your conclusion.  This device must work for most people, or WD wouldn’t be continuing to develop them and there would be hundreds of people on this forum citing problems.

I also have to note that blaming problems interacting with WIndows on WD or other companies is very likely to be getting the source of the problem exactly backwards.  Windows is a closed, proprietary platform, and Microsoft can and does make changes at any time it wants.  If you haven’t experienced problems getting network shares to work between two different versions of Windows, then you don’t have much computer experience.  Do some web searches and you can easily find many, many, many people having such problems.  So I guess by your logic, WIndows is broke, bro.  Perhaps it is time to abandon WIndows since virtually all low cost computer devices like the SMP, most NAS’s, Android devices, etc., generally run Linux, and so make use of the same basic underlying software for interacting with WIndows machines.  I have seen no evidence that Microsoft is interested in improving interoperability between Windows and such devices (EU actions notwithstanding).

@ncarver   Like I said, sharing files and folders amongst the many computers, devices on my network all works great and virtually instantaneous easy set up. Only device it doesn’t work? WDTV.

Am I going to spend hours and risk screwing up my set-up just to get a marginally useful, more-or-less outdated device (WDTV) to work reasonably well most of the time? No. If that makes me lazy, guilt as charged. Time better spent on an HTPC build or at least a NAS.

Regarding your other point about WD continuing to support / “develop” the device, anyone ever get MLB Network to work on this thing? Let me know. Why do they continue to “develop”? Based on the “free offers updates” lol, er, excuse me…“firmware updates”, they aren’t so much improving or “developing”  the device as much as WD is using the device and those who bought them as shills to sell Netflix, Spotify, HULU subscriptions. Wonder what their commission is. Just another reason to build your HTPC now and skip the WDTV’s adkrap.

roscolo: Our two SMPs work perfectly for us with all of our other computer equipment–and we have much more computer-related equipment than most people, given my profession.  By contrast, the first Windows 7 machine that came into the house was a major **bleep** to get interacting properly–as it was for many, many people.

As for an HTPC being “better” than the SMP, well, wait and see if you still think that after living with an HTPC as your only media device for a year–particularly if you have family that must also use it.  I bought the SMPs because I got tired of using an HTPC, and because my less technically inclined family members never found it easy to use.  My assessment is that the SMP is much better for playing ripped videos and Netflix–which is what we used the HTPC for more than 90% of the time.  YMMV, but after having used both an HTPC and the SMP for extended periods of time, I don’t share your opinion about the usefulness of the SMP at all.  In fact I just bought a third unit today, to be used elsewhere, by non-technical folks.

My HTPC (built around Shuttle SH67H3) kicks my SMP’s butt all over the place.So does my Asus tf300 tablet with BubbleUPNP and MX Player apps installed (free). Heck, the HTPC is more intuitive and easier to navigate and use than WDTV’s clunky menu…faster, too. We like to watch a lot of internet content like sports and news shows. Can’t even watch that on WDTV. Maybe with a media server, but that’s a time-consuming pain in the @$$ and still rarely works all the way through even one show. HTPC? No problemo…Just click on it. Much easier.
I do agree with you that the WDTV can be good for some less technically inclined kids to use. With tablets being so cheap now, and getting cheaper, if I was buying something for the kids now I would opt for getting the kids the tablet instead of an SMP because the tablet can do everything the SMP does, and more, and better, plus the tablet has so many other uses and is portable. I would rather have my kids happily watching their content on their tablet instead of coming and bugging me that, “DAD, the WDTV thing is freezing again!” If it’s just Netflix for Kids or attached drive of kids shows/movies? Yeah…SMP all day long for that, if you can’t afford a tablet.

I own a tablet, but I won’t watch anything of any value on a 10" screen.  Kids probably don’t mind, however, and they seem to be as fascinated by tablets as by cell phones.  I, however, am quite baffled as to why some people just love tablets.  A tiny laptop (screen) and without a keyboard.  Brilliant!  I guess another way to put this would be to say that my laptops kick my tablet’s butt.  :slight_smile:

Our SMPs hang about once per month each, with several hours of use per day.  Bet you will have to reboot your HTPC more than that.

I bought the SMP to use as a digital media player and Netflix player.  Works perfectly for those purposes.  Sounds like you want to use it for something it was not designed to do (watch a wide variety of media on the Internet).  I don’t see how the fact that there are more expensive devices that do what you want to do makes the SMP obsolete or useless.  That seems like a rather silly and entirely self-centered attitude.  Furthermore, I don’t see how a tablet just completely obsoletes the SMP.  Yes, you can plug that tablet into your big screen TV I suppose (that is the only way I would use it to watch movies and the like), but how do you control it  from the couch then?  Seems like it is the tablet that is quite useless given the way I (and most people I know) want to watch movies and TV shows.

ncarver wrote:

I own a tablet, but I won’t watch anything of any value on a 10" screen.  Kids probably don’t mind, however, and they seem to be as fascinated by tablets as by cell phones.  I, however, am quite baffled as to why some people just love tablets.  A tiny laptop (screen) and without a keyboard.  Brilliant!  I guess another way to put this would be to say that my laptops kick my tablet’s butt.  :slight_smile:

Our SMPs hang about once per month each, with several hours of use per day.  Bet you will have to reboot your HTPC more than that.

I bought the SMP to use as a digital media player and Netflix player.  Works perfectly for those purposes.  Sounds like you want to use it for something it was not designed to do (watch a wide variety of media on the Internet).

10" screen? No way, man. That’s why the tablet has an HDMI output. Use the tablet to watch on any screen of any size. Movies played this way from my tf300 look noticeably better than movies played through the WDTV. Tablet is a step up in image quality from WDTV, not a step down. Works great over the network, too. Keyboard? Bingo…tablet has that, too. That’s why I got an Asus tf300 transformer tablet. Attach the keyboard dock, and…wallah! instant little laptop the size of a book. Or, detach and use as a tablet. You can get these things dirt cheap now. Way better than lugging around even the smallest laptop. And way better for watching media than the WDTV. This was not the case when WDTV came out, but is probably why these SMP’s won’t be around much longer unless they start selling them for what they are worth…about $20-$30. Even then I’m not sure they’re worth the lags, freezes and restarts they all have.

Never had to reboot my HTPC (Win 7 64) unless I’m shutting it down for the night. Guess if you build a bad one you might have to do this. Troubleshoot your build. With an SSD mine boots in about 12 seconds. Much faster than the “unplug/replug” routine of the WDTV.

WDTV is an acceptable Netflix player. In agreement there. Thankfully Netflix doesn’t involve Windows Shares. :slight_smile:

mike27oct wrote:

 

@roscolo

be sure to use your WDTV as a beer glass coaster.

 

Look, anyone who says with total conviction, as you did, (and I am paraphrasing here to make the point obvious to YOU,) “I believe such and such is absolutely true, because I read it on the Web many times” is a bonified moron!  You really aren’t THIS dumb, are you?

 

I’m not sure why one would use a WDTV as a beer coaster, but hey, thanks for the advice. I guess that could be a legitimate use for someone. Seems a little risky, as the WDTV stands a little tall for that use. You might spill your beer. Be sure to let us know how that works our for you, mike27oct.

Like I said, I use my WDTV for Netflix and Shoutcast and sometimes for playing media with attached storage, tasks we all recognize the WDTV accomplishes fairly well most of the time. Perusing the forums here, we also all recognize (well, maybe not you, mike27oct) that WDTV crashes and freezes sometimes, problems I’ve not experienced when using my HTPC or a tablet (tf300) to do those tasks and many more.

The Windows Shares is a feature of WDTV Live that Western Digital support has acknowledged in my phone call to them when I first wasted a lot of time trying to set it up (sad to say I’m not alone in that endeavor) MAY NOT WORK depending on your set-up.  My workaround of the Windows Share Fail was to install a media server. That took about 5 minutes. No offense mike27oct, but I’m afraid I’m going to have to take Western Digital’s word over yours since we are talking about a Western Digital TV Live. Don’t feel too bad…I thoroughly considered your beer mug advice, an area in which I suspect you may be over qualified. :smiley: Pour yourself a beer and relax.

Regarding your name calling, well, that speaks clearer for you than anything I could add. Shine on, brother man! Have another beer!

As to your inquiry regarding my intelligence or lack thereof, I’m not sure I can have a discussion with you about intelligence. Not productive in any event, and only one of us would understand.

Oh, by the way, it’s “bona fide.” Cheers!  :wink:

ncarver wrote:

I own a tablet, but I won’t watch anything of any value on a 10" screen. 

I prefer the big screen as well, but I have recently begun using two interesting apps called Twonky Beam and VLC Streamer on my iPad lately.  I find them very handy to stream stuff within and outside of my network to the WDTV, Roku. etc.  Watching YouTube subscriptions via Twonky Beam to WDTV is very cool, as well as it pulling Playlists from my PC to play onto my iPad or WDTV.

Streaming ISO and MKV files and other video media files from WDTV drive to iPad by using VLC Streamer is kind of impressive, too.

Search the forum database for messages from me about these two apps.

Obviously different people have very different ideas of usefullness and usability, which is not too suprising given that we use devices in different ways and have different expectations.  Having to keep a mini HDMI cable hanging off my TV, having to try to plug it into my tablet in a dim room, and then having the tablet 12’ from me while I watch (so I can’t change audio tracks, etc.) is pretty much as far away from a perfect video viewing experience as I can imagine.  Having actually tried this scenario a couple of times when desperate,  I vowed never again.  But hey, if that is your idea of fun, by all means have at it.  Just don’t for one second try to tell me that this is definitely the better “viewing experience.”  You will have me ROTFLMAO.

Quite interested to hear that roscolo apparently has the only completely bug free version of any Windows OS–or any other OS for that matter–in existence (since it never ever hangs/crashes/needs rebooting).  One wonders where to purchase such a miraculous OS?

ncarver wrote:

Quite interested to hear that roscolo apparently has the only completely bug free version of any Windows OS–or any other OS for that matter–in existence (since it never ever hangs/crashes/needs rebooting).  One wonders where to purchase such a miraculous OS?

 

Purchased my Win 7 64 in my HTPC from Newegg. If your system crashes or freezes, or you need to reboot, you probably have mobo settings or BIOS wrong. Or maybe you used cheap, bad components in your build. Or maybe you got a stick of bad RAM or a bad CPU. Whatever it is, you need to troubleshoot and fix those issues before you put the system into service. Maybe that’s why my system builds (including my HTPC) are rock solid.

Reboots fix bugs in OS? News to me, bro.

Thanks.

BSOD mean anything to you?  Apparently not!