Scandisk my WD TV Live Hub

I copied some of my DVD movies to WD TV Live Hub. I plays great until… 

several days ago, i noticed on some part of the movies have sound lagging and some frame drop. Then, I tried to play the same file on my computer using VLC (connected via Network). on My PC, it plays better, but still notice some lag and frame drop on the same part of the movie.

My conclusion that the file might have corrupted (maybe due to force shut off by unplugging the power). 

How do i check the internal drive integrity for file coruption? If it is USB drive, i can simply check using scandisk, but since WD TV Live HUB is NAS drive, how to i check them?

thank you

I don’t think its your hard drive.

You can’t break a video file and especially a few video files so that they hav sound/frame lag, its not like stretching a tape or something like that.

Sounds to me like you either have issues with your HDMI cable or your video files were bad from the start.

Watch the DVD on your PC before you copy it to your WDTV. Then you will know.

adhia wrote:

I copied some of my DVD movies to WD TV Live Hub. I plays great until… 

 

several days ago, i noticed on some part of the movies have sound lagging and some frame drop. Then, I tried to play the same file on my computer using VLC (connected via Network). on My PC, it plays better, but still notice some lag and frame drop on the same part of the movie.

 

My conclusion that the file might have corrupted (maybe due to force shut off by unplugging the power). 

 

How do i check the internal drive integrity for file coruption? If it is USB drive, i can simply check using scandisk, but since WD TV Live HUB is NAS drive, how to i check them?

 

thank you

Sure can files get corrupted during network transfer. I think this is well known Samba implementation problem (google for IRPStacksize, opportunistic locking …). Quickest way to check it out is to create large (500MB+) WinRar archive without compression (compression method: store/none) or a Nero image file (nrg or iso) of a few hundred diferent size/type files, directly into shared folder on the Live Hub. In my case each time when I try to open such created file I get “The file “???” header is corrupt…” error message in a case of WinRar archive and corrupted content (when extracted) in a case of nrg or iso image. If the very same archive is created firstly on a local drive and then copied over the network to the same share on a Live Hub – there is no problem at all. So I’m very cautious since I’ve noticed this, I’m using it exclusively just for non-critical video files (no chance to put my desktop data files on it again) and I never ever create/produce (DVD Shrink, ConvertX, PowerISO…) content directly onto it, I always copy finished ISOs or DVD folders from PC to it and that way is OK.

And yes, each NAS device should have some kind of internal file system check/repair mechanism but Live Hub has none, so I don’t trust Live Hub enough to store anything except dispensable data on it.

Well all fine and well.

But I don’t know how you sleep at night with worrying so much.

I have TB’s of Network drives, stream Blurays, 1080ps blah blah, and have no issues.

If a file is damaged, checking the hard drive wont fix anything, if its broke its broke, people seem to obsessed with checking hardware than they do using the item.

And as for unrarring a file before you watch it, just seems crazy to me. There is being careful and just plain madness.

Of all the problems I have read about ISO’s and the like the common denominator is the software used to create it, and WD bugs.

wdtvhub wrote:

Well all fine and well.

 

But I don’t know how you sleep at night with worrying so much.

 

I have TB’s of Network drives, stream Blurays, 1080ps blah blah, and have no issues.

 

If a file is damaged, checking the hard drive wont fix anything, if its broke its broke, people seem to obsessed with checking hardware than they do using the item.

 

And as for unrarring a file before you watch it, just seems crazy to me. There is being careful and just plain madness.

 

Of all the problems I have read about ISO’s and the like the common denominator is the software used to create it, and WD bugs.

There are two separate issues and I didn’t said they’re related. One is absence of check disk utility which really should be implemented in any device like this, other one is possible data corruption which is occurring under certain conditions, regardless of what are you saying. What’s the point of denying samba oplocks bug? Many NAS-es have it and WD Live Hub is one of them. Obviously you didn’t read my post at all, otherwise you wouldn’t ask what’s the point of unraring… what? movies? C’mon…

“corrupted content (when extracted) in a case of nrg or iso image”

?

So you waste your time creating Winrar files and unacking IS0/NRG images onto the internal drive just to say its broken ?

Surely if someone was worried about hardware, they would not be constantly hammering a drive with limited chipset etc in a media server just to find errors.

If the WD Hub was that bad, then everyone would be complaining. All I can say is I stream very high bitrates over a wired network woth no errors at all. I also have had the internal hard drive full of Blurays/1080p/720p all with no errors.

The problem I feel is the container itself. not the hardware.

“What’s the point of denying samba oplocks bug?”

I am not denying anything, I simply skip it because its not relevant to me, nor has it ever been with all my years of streaming to and from WD boxes. I may just be lucky or I have more to do with my life than analyse every byte to an from my WDTV Hub :slight_smile:

wdtvhub what is your problem? Why are you so aggressive? Every time when someone dares to express some doubts or dissatisfaction, you intentionally miss a point just to make him completely stupid. I’m not obsessed with testing and analyzing, I just wrote what I have checked and how did I check when I have encountered similar problem as original poster is describing. That is why I have done this test so I probably didn’t do it because I’m mad or crazy, as you described what I am doing.

Here is single answer to all your provocative questions like if I unrar each movie before I watch it or am I unpacking disk images just to provoke some discrepancy at the byte level etc. … no, certainly not. I hope you have simply overlooked third sentence of my first reply to the original poster (not to you, so I really don’t understand where all this personal involvement comes from) which states: “Quickest way to check it out is to create large (500MB+) WinRar archive…” Test, you know, to check it out, just for test. Live Hub is excellent media player but it is also advertised as a NAS device and I wanted to be sure if/how much can I trust it in a terms of data storage device. If this is beyond your streaming capabilities I sincerely apologize, it surely won’t happen again, since you’ve already mention wasting of my time I really shouldn’t reply to your posts any more.

Regards

Marko

Agressive, hardly…I even had a smiley face at the end of my last post :slight_smile:

But seriously, use a paragraph, its easier to read.

Onto the Ops issue and your solution. Moving a large archived file and trying to unrar it to prove a point does seem strange to me.

My point being is I can copy very large video files to it and play without a glitch.

Heres another thing though, if you copy a file to the WD, I am pretty sure it crashes out on transfer (Windows) as it does its own CRC check on transfer, therefore, it would tell you there was an error on transfer.

Same as the WD and VLC, if you have a broken file, it crashes the majority of the time. So with that logic, I think its more likely a bad convertion or a WD Hub bug.

/cuddle :slight_smile:

The WDTVs run LINUX.  

They have their own equivalents of “Chkdsk”.   On rare ocassions, I’ve found sparse files in my hub that the hub generated after doing a checkdisk… 

I believe the one the WDs use is called “chkntfs”.

Second, it’s EXTREMELY unlikely for a file to be corrupted DURING a network transfer.  

There are umpteen layers of consistency and integrity checks in all the protocols involved.

Once it’s ON the disk, there’s any number of things that could cause corruption, the most likely being an “unclean” shutdown of the system.

Oplocks and IRPStacksize don’t corrupt files.

Oplocks and IRPStacksize sure doesn’t corrupt files. Those are just two out of many lanmanserver parameters which can be tweaked to avoid possible data corruption. In a case of the Live Hub this can’t be done on a server side and doing it just on client side (PC) it doesn’t help.  It would be much simpler if you would check it by yourself instead of talking so much about a facts which you’re obviously not enough familiar with:

Create WinRar archive (at least 300MB) directly on a Hub’s shared folder, select compression level none/store only. Then open that file from target location and you’ll see this

rar to share.JPG

If the same archive is created on a local drive and then copied over the network to the same share as before, when you open it from there, you get this

rar to local.JPG

More real life scenario goes like this:

Download from a DV camera to a PC some videos, then compile final DVD-Video ISO image or DVD folder directly to the shared folder on a Live Hub. You’ll encounter similar symptoms as original poster is describing. If output destination is local drive and content is from there copied to the Hub, everything is fine.

:angry:

Original thread.

“I copied some of my DVD movies to WD TV Live Hub.”

So why do you keep going on about creating things…maybe you should also read the threads rather than creating answers to problems that are not even relevant in this case.

Guys,

Slow down your tone is getting aggressive, remember we are here to help users not argue about the same issue over and over. 

Hello.

The problem with extracting a rar file from a folder on a computer to the internal hd of the hub has been reported before. I would assume that trying to create a rar file from files on a computer to the hub hd would be as problematic. I never try this yet, but I will and get back to you.

TonyPh12345 wrote:

The WDTVs run LINUX.  

 

They have their own equivalents of “Chkdsk”.   On rare ocassions, I’ve found sparse files in my hub that the hub generated after doing a checkdisk… 

 

I believe the one the WDs use is called “chkntfs”.

 

Second, it’s EXTREMELY unlikely for a file to be corrupted DURING a network transfer.  

 

There are umpteen layers of consistency and integrity checks in all the protocols involved.

 

Once it’s ON the disk, there’s any number of things that could cause corruption, the most likely being an “unclean” shutdown of the system.

 

Oplocks and IRPStacksize don’t corrupt files.

Dear All… Thanks for all the answer. I know in forum, things can go out of mouth… hehe… I appreciate with all the discussion. 

I know that most of “low cost” NAS usually running linux kernel. and by standard, they have their own disk checking when they boot up. Usually, they start up very slow, because they need to check every cluster in the hard drive. 

With WD, I am considered the boot up time is quite fast for a NAS. So I am wondering if they running the disk checking or not. 

I am interested with Tony’s answer. how do you know when the chkntfs runs? is it possible to connect to WDlive hub via telnet / SSH to run the chkntfs manually?

thanks

How did you copy the files to the WDTV Live Hub?

There are known issues with large file transfers over USB (not WDTV related).   I have had issues copying large files to a USB connected drive.   Less problems when using a USB flash drive.   I have had similar issues that your have experienced.  I went back and verified the integrity of the file and determined that it was a bad copy.

Don’t know anything about doing a scandisk on your hub, but out of curiousity, do you have your files backed up? Doesn’t sound like it. Otherwise, you could just reload from your back up. Then you’d know for sure if it’s the file or the drive.

Personally, I wouldn’t want to rip all my files again. With the price of multi-terrabyte drives in the $100 range, it’s well worth having them backed up.