Put transcoded files directories (.wdmc) under their own directory tree

Copying the idea from a reply I sent to Support and suggested to post here.

This is more of an issue on the MyPassport Wireless where when the drive is connected to the computer by USB then all the .wdmc directories are visible and do not have the hidden attribute applied.  To a directory structure over to the computer is more problematical because when I copy a directory structure across then I have to go back and remove the .wdmc directories from the target. This being the computer.

I know a way round this is to connect the MyPassport Wireless by USB cable to the computer, find the .wdmc directories and flag them as hidden. Thing is, for a few things I frequently do it is more convenient for me to allow Windows Explorer to display hidden files.

On the full-blown NASs there is no facility to connect them directly to the computer by USB, apart from one issue. Using NFS. I recently copied a lot of media from one NAS to another. Via. SSH and the Linux bash shell, mounted the file system on the DL NAS from the MyCloud NAS using NFS and proceeded to use cp to copy everything across. I did this because the copy would take a substantial number of hours and I did not wish to tie-up my laptop for a day or more so I performed a direct NAS to NAS copy. I realised later why it was taking a LOT longer because all the transcoded files were coming across. Quite annoying and inconvenient. Should not have happened.

Being an applications programmer and network engineer, it would be simple so store transcoded files under a central tree.  As in …

/ --+-- Media1
    |
    +-- Media2
    |
    +-- Media3
    |
    +-- .wdmc --+-- Media1
                |
                +-- Media2
                |
                +-- Media3

Hopefully you can read the above as I used a fixed-width font.  The arrangement above make a lot more sense and still easy to manage in code only because in previous programs I’ve written I’ve done similar and it was quite efficient.  Actually an additional reference database would not be needed and would be over complicate things.  Only mentioning this because I made the exact same mistake a few years ago over-complicating it with a separate database then quickly discovered an extra database was not needed.  Just prefix a few characters to the beginning of the path and use the original path appended to that and store meta data.

Maybe not explained well…

ie:

/Dir1/Dir2/Data.dat
/Dir1/Dir2/201502.dat
/Dir1/Data.dat

/.meta/Dir1/Dir2/Meta.dat
/.meta/Dir1/Dir2/201502.dat
/.meta/Dir1/Data.dat

Easy to do. Very simple. Extra reference database not required and the user’s directory structure is clean of any meta data, in WD’s case, transcoded files.