Passport not portable? too fragile!


#1

![Community Manager]( “Community Manager”) bill_s ![Community Manager]( “Community Manager”)

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bill_s

Posts: 1,615

Registered: 11-24-2009

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![]( “Solution!”)Re: WD My Passport not showing up[ New ]

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05-10-2010 12:07 PM

It’s taken a fall or two to the soft carpet floor from a height of about 16 inches, but I don’t think this should be a problem.

 

I’m sorry, but those 16 inches are more than enough to damage a drive beyond repair.  And more than once, it’s a miracle it lasted this long.  Remember, a drive has a platter(s) spinning at more than 5,000 rpms.  If that head hits the platter, it can take chunks out of it destroying your data permanently.  An internal hard drive that’s been dropped a mere half an inch can be seriously damaged.

Once a drive is running, you shouldn’t even move it because of the wear stress that it produces on the spindle motor.  Spinning drives in both laptops and pcs that are moved around a lot can expect to have much higher and quicker failure rates.


#2

JUST HOW FRAGILE IS THIS PASSPORT AND IS IT ADVISABLE TO USE IT AS A BACKUP ETC. IF IT IS SO EASILY DAMAGED?

pLEASE ADVISE…


#3

I’ve already posted this in your other thread, but because I don’t think it can be stated enough…

It’s as reliable as a 5400 rpm spinning drive can be.  You just can’t drop it, especially if it’s running, and expect it to keep working.  You shouldn’t even move an external drive once it’s running, let alone drop it.  I don’t even pick up my laptop and move it around when it’s on, because of the wear and tear that causes a drive. 

I own one of the original WD Passports that came out about 4 years ago - the big silver one.  It still runs fine, and I’ve never had any issues with it, because I’m CAREFUL with how I handle it.  If you want a drive that has a greater chance of surviving being dropped, then you should look into purchasing a solid state drive.  Because NO company will guarantee their spinning drives against that kind of abuse.

In answer to you quoting my original post, half an inch is just about the distance it takes to hit the max G force a drive can handle.  And, you can see in my quote above, I was referring to internal drives.  But I don’t see why it wouldn’t pertain to externals just as well.

So, if that’s how you plan to handle a drive, dropping or moving it around, then maybe you don’t want to use an external drive to save data to.  I guarantee you that you will be making regular trips to data recovery to retrieve the data.  Or, you can just keep a backup of your data.  It will be cheaper in the long run.


#4

OK so thank you for your reply…this confirms your original post…and therefore confirms my issue here…one of the main reasons I purchased my passport was PORTABILITY…it even states it on the Box " My Passport Essential - Utra-portable Hard Drive" so from what you are telling me this is False Advertising and grossly misleading!


#5

Azzek wrote:

OK so thank you for your reply…this confirms your original post…and therefore confirms my issue here…one of the main reasons I purchased my passport was PORTABILITY…it even states it on the Box " My Passport Essential - Utra-portable Hard Drive" so from what you are telling me this is False Advertising and grossly misleading!

Wow, it’s amazing how you can come up with your own definitions of words.  According to thefreedictionary.com, portable means, “Carried or moved with ease…”  No where do I find it meaning “unbreakable.”  Your Passport drive is by definition portable.  It’s just not unbreakable.  Handle it with care.