My WD10000H1U hard drive not working properly


#1

I had connected my WD10000H1U hard drive to laptop and was transferring some data when my toddler fell it on its side. After that, the hard drive lost connection and now I am facing problems connecting it to my laptop. When I connect the hard drive using the USB cable, my Windows 7 laptop detects it and shows it up in the Devices list as ‘My Book’. However, it does not show up in My Computer as a drive. I have also tried some data recovery softwares like EASUS and Virtual Labs, but they fail to detect the failed partition (that’s what I think it is). But, most likely there is some internal physical damage. In  this scenario, will I be able to recover the data somehow. I have loads of personal stuff, photos, videos, documents, that I had put onto the hard drive and it will be a shame to lose them. Can somebody help, please?!! :cry:


#2

You’re probably looking at data recovery.  That’s about the only thing I can recommend that will give you the best chance of recovering your data.


#3

Does the drive attempt to spin up? Does it vibrate? Buzz?


#4

It does vibrate, buzz, the lights come on. But, it makes a weird noise as if it is trying to do something and then gives up. The disk is under warranty so I can get it replaced. But, how do I recover the data? Is there some data recovery software that can help me?


#5

Many data recovery tools I have tried give an Error 27. What does that mean? And how can I recover from it?


#6

If you hold the drive in your hand, can you feel it vibrate periodically? If so, then your drive may have a seized spindle motor, or a stiction fault. Stiction occurs when the heads land on a smooth section of the platters instead of their normal landing zone.

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stiction#Hard_disk_drives

Stiction forces can often be overcome with gentle “percussive maintenance”. :wink:

This thread may interest you (it has a couple of success stories):
http://forum.hddguru.com/samsung-portable-500gb-dead-t14351.html#p99445

See the warnings on page 5 of the following article.

Disk Drive Science (Steve Legg):
http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/7803/5/DiskDriveScience_copy.pdf

Here are photos of what can go wrong:
http://forum.hddguru.com/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=15911#p105001


#7

Thanks for the reply! Am going to try this today when I reach home. I should have guessed as this technique can be used for a lot of electronics. Wish me luck!! Wonder what the right technical term is for kicking something to make it work :wink: