Must MyCloud be connected to my PRIMARY router?

My computer & WD Setup cannot see the new MyCloud, but lights are blue & seem to be operating. I think I am following all instructions.

Here is my configuration:
a) Spectrum Cable from outdoor post to Arris box (Internet / Phone / Router)
b) Ethernet cable from Arris box to in-home Linksys Router
c) Ethernet cable from Linksys Router to MyCloud box

All home devices gain WiFi through the Linksys router. Any ideas why the MyCloud device does not appear during WD installation from my WiFi computer?

Can you access the My Cloud Dashboard with a web browser? If so you can perform all the setup and configuration through the My Cloud Dashboard.

http://support.wdc.com/KnowledgeBase/answer.aspx?ID=13965

Any time you put a second router behind an existing router, if you do not configure either the first router or the second router properly, local network devices can have problems connecting to each other and the Internet. What configuration changes have you made to both routers? To which port on the Linksys is the Arris connected to? Is the My Cloud connected to one of the four networking ports on the Linksys?

Set your linksys up as an access point instead of a router, or if that option isn’t available, connect The linksys to the arris via a LAN port instead of the WAN port. Be sure to disable dhcp on the linksys so that your arris router handles all addressing tasks.

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Tony,
I want to set up a second router as an access point. Are your instructions above appropriate for doing this? I know I need to set the router to act as an access point, but are their other tasks to do before it works correctly? Thanks, Mike

If the router can work in “AP mode”, then yes. Set it to AP mode, give it an SSID to broadcast under, and it will serve as a wireless access point to the subnet controlled by the router that handles that subnet.

I am thinking that maybe the OP’s network does not have proper bi-directional routes established. As such, the MyCloud gets requests, but cannot send responses.

See for instance, this hypothetical scenario:

NetA = 192.168.0.XX
NetB = 192.168.1.XX
NetC = (public internet)

NetA sits between NetB and NetC, like this:

NetC <–> NetA <–> NetB

The MyCloud is attached to NetA.
The OP’s workstation is attached to NetB.

A request is sent from the OP’s workstation, and goes out the default gateway on NetB, which routes the traffic to NetA. However, NetA does not have a defined route to respond back to the device on NetB, and tries to use the default gateway, which points to NetC, which is the portal to the internet.

EG, NetA would need rules like this:

192.168.1.0 255.255.255.0 -> 192.168.0.254 (<–route back to NetB–Suspect missing!)
... 255.255.255.0 -> 192.168.0.1 (<–Route to internet)

and NetB would have rules like this:
... 255.255.255.0 -> 192.168.1.1 (<–Route to NetA)

All requests not in NetB will be forwarded to NetA, where any request not serviceable by NetA, will be forwarded to NetC (internet). Without the return route from NetA to NetB, The devices on NetB will be unable to get responses from the devices on NetA.

Programming routers is not the purpose of this community board though.

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