I Have some questions about Hard Drive Shock Tolerance


#1

I was holding a WD 500GB EIDE hard drive (WD5000JBRTL) and was puting it back on the shelf when I accidentally dropped it. I kind of broke the fall of it with my foot, but it still hit the tile floor pretty hard. I’d estimate it was between 3 and 4 feet off the floor when I dropped it.

* it was still sealed in its box with the carton protection around it

* it worked after dropping it

According to the stat sheet, it is supposed to be able to resist a non-operational shock of 250 G’s. Is there any simplified way of calculating what it was subject to with the drop?

Did I void the warranty or damage the hard drive in any way?

Did the carton cover and box absorb some of the shock?

any help is appreciated! thanks in advance!

ksg


#2

I would say your fine, I have seen dilivery guys do worse when unloading computer hardware from their trucks in to shops.

While packaged they are usually crash proof.


#3

ksgtarheel wrote:

I was holding a WD 500GB EIDE hard drive (WD5000JBRTL) and was puting it back on the shelf when I accidentally dropped it. I kind of broke the fall of it with my foot, but it still hit the tile floor pretty hard. I’d estimate it was between 3 and 4 feet off the floor when I dropped it.

 

* it was still sealed in its box with the carton protection around it

 

* it worked after dropping it

 

According to the stat sheet, it is supposed to be able to resist a non-operational shock of 250 G’s. Is there any simplified way of calculating what it was subject to with the drop?

 

Did I void the warranty or damage the hard drive in any way?

 

Did the carton cover and box absorb some of the shock?

 

any help is appreciated! thanks in advance!

 

ksg

Actually, and I don’t want to bum you out or contradict skozzy, but there is no way to know whether you damaged the drive or not.  That is considered a hard fall, and I would normally recommend getting it replaced.  However, you could run our DLG Diagnostics, both quick and extended tests to see if the platters or head were physically damaged.  If you don’t run into any SMART issues, or you don’t see any bad sectors, then you could be a little more comfortable about continuing to use the drive.  On the other hand, if you see any issues, exchange the drive.