Ethernet transfer speed?

I am trying to decide between this or live plus.

Main thing that makes me want this one is internal storage and the fact that it comes with a gigabit port.

What i want to know is if it is capable of getting high transfer rates, say to at least 50-60mb’s per second?

Thanks.

Sadly, not on my home network. I cannot get more than 9.2 Mb/sec when transferring files from the pc to the wd tv live hub. Both the pc and wd tv live hub are connected to a  WNDR3700  router using gigabit ethernet cables …

I can reach transfer speeds of around 2.3 Mbyte/second thats around 13.8 Mbits/s on a connection where I can reach 60Mbits/s esily So it is not real slow but also not real fast…

I can get a grand total of 2.4mb per second agonisingly slow

I get 6-7 MB (48 - 56 Mbit) using my 10/100 connection while streaming video/music.  I have cat 6 waiting to be ran, but been lazy about it.  I have no problems streaming blu-ray on this setup.  I’ll put in the effort to rewire my office this weekend, see if I get any better speeds.

alaskanboi wrote:

I get 6-7 MB (48 - 56 Mbit) using my 10/100 connection while streaming video/music.  I have cat 6 waiting to be ran, but been lazy about it.  I have no problems streaming blu-ray on this setup.  I’ll put in the effort to rewire my office this weekend, see if I get any better speeds.

You won’t … If your current cable is Cat 5 and error-free, cat 6 just wasted your money… :slight_smile:

Shared 100 meg connection going to dedicated gig connections… should see a gain to a point where the HDD speeds are the factor, not ethernet. And getting a spool of cat 6 was free…  All i gotta do is wall fish the other outlets in and I’m done…

A single blu ray stream will probably stay the same… however transfer speeds should increase

You may still not need to worry about the cable.

Though the “Category 5” certification was deprecated some time ago (thus requiring Gigabit Ethernet to use Cat5e or better) *most* of the time Cat5 works just fine.

Especially in the home environment where cable lengths are short.  

The Cat5e spec is good to 100 meters, so if you’re living in a mansion, it might still apply.   :slight_smile:

Similar to wkwk, I get about 9-10Mbytes/sec with a gigabit NIC in my PC to the player through a gigabit switch. I’m using Cat-5e cables @around 100’. Shorter gigabit runs work error free without using Cat-6 so you might want to upgrade your switches and NICs before pulling the cable. Fishing cable can be a pain. As a note, Cat 5 (no e) doesn’t fly well at all for gigabit connections as it’s way below spec.

In comparison, transfers from my PC to a DLink DNS-323 NAS I have are around 25Mbytes/sec. The problem is NAS boxes (and this player is one) have small embedded CPUs that are running an OS, user interface, and network interface at the same time.  You’ll max out that little CPU long before the HDD or network is the bottleneck.

The ethernet speeds are similar to a lower-end NAS and that’s expected. Think about it this way, WD picked a mix of hardware and software to make the experience usable for most people as a network player. It isn’t a PS3, XBOX, or home-grown media center PC and nor is it priced that way. It’s small, quiet, low (electrical) power, integrates well many TV setups so it  satisfies most  player needs without too much hassle. If you need a higher-end setup, go for it.

What a lot of techie people lose sight of is that most products are made for the masses, not for the over-clocking crowd :dizzy_face: IMO, the hub seems to be about right for many but not all people.

Wel I am working with those cat 5 and other novelties which are already outdates by cat 6. But still slow… other things tested over the same connection go fast it must be the hub… or… the hub ghost… that slow things down.

If enabled, you could try disabling the Twonky server. In my case, that’s what I did.

I’m only using a Samba share which tends to be lighter weight.

Having multiple services/features enabled you may not be using could load down the hub.

I already had the rest of the equipment in place.   I was maxing out my 100 meg connection. How would adding capacity not be worth it?  I was saying I still got 50-60 while still using my connection for other things (internet, other video streaming, hosting…)  So I went from one link to multiple links.  

Any which way, I ran the cable and saw my speeds increast to 90 - 100 Mb for the WD. Running cable to my cabinet was easy… the perks of an unfinished basement.

I really wonder how you did that. when I plug my cable into a speedtest it gives me the fatest speeds. But as soon as I plug it into the WD it becomes slow. I think cables and all the mumbo speed you can imagine is not what this is about. The hub itself has limitatiions and no matter how fast your connections are, you will still see the limitations of the hub.

It can be the writing speed, it can be w whole bunch of things that slow down transmission speeds in the hub.